Friday, December 31, 2010

New Year's Eve

It is the last day of 2010, and as I look back over the last six months, I realize that I have learned many new things about ball-jointed dolls, and I've also had a chance to apply some things that I already knew how to do, to the doll making process. I still have a long way to go before Aalish is finished, but now I am working with more confidence, and with more knowledge. There are still many new things to learn. I am excited by this creative doll making process. We are expecting guests from out of town this evening, to help us say goodbye to the old year, and to welcome the New Year. I am looking forward to the new year because I expect to finish Aalish in 2011.

I wish everyone a Happy New Year!




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Thursday, December 30, 2010

Knee Joints

Today I didn't get much done on my doll. I sat and pondered the knees. I still have to do some modeling on the right knee to get it up to par with the left knee, which is almost finished. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day, but some days just do not cooperate.




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Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Mold Making Tutorial




Mold Making Tutorial by Donn Kinney of Bishonen House.

All the links I have ever found for this tutorial have been broken, for example:
> A Resin Casting How-To
> Bishonen House Mold Making Tutorial
> Donn shows you how he makes his molds.
> http://www.bishonenhouse.com/browse_dept_items.asp?categ_id=20&parent_ids=6&Name=Moldmaking

This information was saved by a member of The Joint, and recently made available. It seems to have come from Archive.Org.

I am posting this tutorial for educational purposes, and because it is difficult to find, otherwise. I do not guarantee that this information is currently useful or correct.

I have edited the tutorial to correct typos, misspellings, and so forth. The tutorial begins here:




Making a basic silicone mold with a core.

Please excuse typos/misspellings/rants etc.
This is far from a polished page, but as I've been promising about 2 dozen people a tutorial on how to mold hollow parts I decided that I really needed to get this page up. (I'm sorry it's not more complete.)




Here we start with a finished proto body sculpt. (Getting to this point is a whole other tutorial, we'll skip that one for now.)






The first stage to making a production mold is dividing off your sculpture into sections. Usually body parts can be divided off into a 2-part mold with a front and a back.

I built up a wall out of WED clay (a water based, slow-drying clay).
Most water-based pottery clays will also work.

(Remember when molding with silicone always do a small sample experiment first to determine if the material you're using contains sulfur.)

Notice how I add acrylic hemispheres, and a channel wall, to the clay dividing wall?
These will make sure that both halves of the finished mold line up perfectly.
This would also be a good time to point out the built-up column at the base of the body.
This will be the area that the core mold forms into and attaches to (you'll see later).






After the clay wall is built up, and a perfect clean dividing line is created where the waterclay meets the chest sculpt, build up a cardboard wall around the edge, using hot glue. (This will hold in the silicone, so make sure it's completely sealed and strong.)

You do not want $100 dollars worth of silicone to end up on the floor and your master sculpt ruined!






Once you're sure you've created a sealed mold wall, mix up and pour in the silicone.
For my master molds I use MoldMax30 silicone from smoothon.com
Please note if you do not have a vacuum chamber to degass your mixed silicone
you will not be able to get bubble free molds using the high strength pro silicones.

(Using vacuum chambers is enough info for another tutorial.)

MISSING 2 PICS

The next step is to wait 24 hours for the silicone to set up.
Once the silicone is set up, flip over the mold and take the bottom piece of cardboard off.
Be carefull not to tear the cardboard on the sides! You still need that.
Now carefully dig out the waterclay, (you don't want to scratch your master sculpt) except for the thick column under the body.
We want to leave this because it will be the channel for a our core mold.
Once all the waterclay is removed, use a litle water on a stiff brush to get every bit of the water clay off of your sculpt and the part of the silicone that is exposed.
Once your model and the mold are all cleaned, coat the exposed silicone thoroughly with
a release agent.

This is very important!!! Remember, silicone will only stick to one thing, and that's silicone!

Once the exposed silicone is coated with release agent, then mix up more silicone and pour the other half of your mold.






After waiting another 24 hours, peel off the cardboard and gently pry apart your finished front and back body mold. Once you pull out your sculpt and put it someplace safe it's a good idea to put the mold back together (always store your molds closed) and let it sit for 4 or 5 days so that it fully cures.
If you're in a hurry you can bake it at 100 degrees Fahrenheit for 5 or 6 hours.






After the mold is fully cured take it apart and begin to build up waterclay where you want your resin to build up.
My bodies are hollow in the midsection so I'll leave a nice hollowed out area there, ..(do this to both sides of the mold)
NOTE: There's no clay in the upper body in this pic but that's because the hollow area is going to be sealed, so that when i pour the core from the bottom, no silicone will flow into it.






Once you have both sides of your mold built up with clay, where you want your resin to be, fit them back together (this may take a while). Shave down and build up clay so that they fit together perfectly again. Once you have them together, use a tool or you fingers to smooth the halves of the clay buildups together so that when you pour in the silicone for the core it won't leak into your mold.

(This would be realllly bad!)






Build up a cardboard wall around the bottom of your mold.
You can hotglue cardboard to silicone, it won't stick permanantly.
If you don't fiddle with it, it will hold and be leakproof just long enough for your silicone to cure.

Coat the exposed silicone with release agent

Then pour in your silicone and wait 24 hours






Once your silicone has cured, gently tear off all the cardboard (The small hole in the mold was made later so that resin could be pored into it.)

(Making pour holes/vents is yet another tutorial.)





Now take apart your mold and wash all the water clay out and dry your mold thoroughly.






You now have a 3 piece mold; the 2 sides, and a rather lewd looking core that keeps
the lower half of your casting hollow.




Here's a look at a prototype head mold and its core.






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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Large Piece Of Leather




Today I found/remembered this huge piece of leather that was in the garage. Doll shoes! I'm also collecting various old leather gloves. I'll be looking in the Thrift shop for old leather handbags that are nicely colored. Even though I am still far away from a finished doll, I'm beginning to gather the materials I'll need to finish her.






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Monday, December 27, 2010

Learning To Be A Doll Artist



EDIT 20110407: The date that Learning to be a Doll Artist will be available is UNKNOWN at this time. The original release date was January 2011, then that was changed to March 2011, and now the Reverie Publishing site says Summer 2011.



Time is running out to Pre-order Learning To Be A Doll Artist by Martha Armstrong-Hand. LTBADA will ship in January 2011. All Pre-orders in the USA will receive Free Shipping and Handling from Reverie Publishing. All International Pre-orders will get $8.00 USD taken off the S&H at the time the book is shipped.

Once the book starts shipping, regular S&H fees will apply, so place your Pre-order today!

LTBADA will also be available from Amazon.Com in July 2011.

LTBADA is a classic doll making book by one of America's finest doll makers, Martha Armstrong-Hand.



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Sunday, December 26, 2010

Cold Feet




Today I worked on the right foot, trying to make it match the left foot. This is a top view.






This is a bottom view.





This is what it looked like outside this morning. The electrical power went out at about 8:45 PM last night (2010-12-25), and didn't come back on until 4:10 PM this afternoon (2010-12-26).





Last night we made ratatouille for the Xmas supper. This is what it looked like before it went into the oven for two hours.





This is what it looked like after two hours in the oven. It was delicious! While it was baking in the oven, we watched Ratatouille on the DVD/TV. I love that movie!






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Friday, December 24, 2010

Tulle Wig Cap Nº 1




Today I played around with the tulle and elastic. First I stretched the elastic around the head and stitched it close. Then I put the tulle over the head and put the elastic over the tulle. I pulled and tugged it into shape over the head, then stitched it to the tulle with a needle and thread. I trimmed the excess tulle with scissors, then turned it over and put it on the head. It is now ready to try knotting some hair onto the tulle.






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Thursday, December 23, 2010

Tulle




Today I went to the craft store and bought some tulle and elastic. I'm going to try and make a wig cap with these materials.






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Wednesday, December 22, 2010

FLUMO - AIR DRYING CASTING SLIP






FLUMO AIR-DRYING CASTING SLIP will be available in the USA towards the end of January 2011. It is shipping from Barcelona, Spain. SIO-2 is the company that makes the slip.

The contact person in the USA is:

Regina Edmonds
E-mail: reginaedmonds@whitegothic.com

WHITE GOTHIC STUDIOS (Distributor for FLUMO)
4890 NW 13th Terrace
Pompano Beach, FL 33064
UNITED STATES
Phone number: (954) 420-5120

Web site: www.whitegothic.com



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Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Wig Making Link




I found a very informative site about making human wigs which may be useful for making wigs for BJDs: Wigmaking



The first step is to measure the head.
I'm guessing at these measurements, based on the above diagram.
a. Circumference of the head above the ears.
b. From front hairline to nape of neck.
c. From top of ear to top of ear.
d. From front of ear to front of ear.
e. From hairline to hairline at top of eyes.
f. Across the back of the neck.
g. From bottom of hairline at the neck to the ear.

A step-by-step wigmaking tutorial shows how a human wig is made:
An Introduction to Wig Making Step 1
An Introduction to Wig Making Step 2
An Introduction to Wig Making Step 3




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Monday, December 20, 2010

Some More On Wigs




This is the wig from the $2.50 porcelain doll that I bought at the Thrift store awhile ago.



They attached a spiral of wefted synthetic hair to a tulle wig cap. The weft braid was stitched to the tulle. There is a lot of glue because they glued the wig cap to the doll's head.

I'm already getting some ideas about how I will make my first wig for Aalish. At this time, my idea is to use a piece of flat sewing elastic to make a band around her head where I want the hairline to be. Then I will shape a piece of tulle over that, and stitch it to the elastic, to make a wig cap. Then I will ventilate the tulle wig cap with some synthetic hair.




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Sunday, December 19, 2010

Ventilating a Wig




I've been thinking some more about making a wig for my doll. The following diagram shows how to ventilate a wig. This is similar to how the hair in human wigs is knotted.



1. Reach through a hole in the netting with the ventilator tool.
2, Hook several hairs in the middle.
3. Pull the hairs through the hole in the netting.
4. Put the tool through another hole in the netting and hook the hairs again.
5. Pull the hair through the loop of hair on the tool.
6. Keeping tension on the hairs, pull them tightly into a knot.

Repeat this procedure until all the strands on the netting have some hair knotted on them.

The next thing I need to learn how to do is to make the netting (tulle) fit the doll head.




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Saturday, December 18, 2010

Left Lower Leg Modified




Since I made the rough plaster mold of the old lower leg, I felt comfortable modifying the lower leg to start working from the new working drawing. Here is the left lower leg with about 3/4 inch cut off the ankle.





Another angle of the same leg with the cut-off piece.





Here is the modified leg with the thigh.





Another view of the modified lower leg and thigh.


That's all I did today. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day.




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Friday, December 17, 2010

Rough Shell Mold of Lower Leg Part 2




Today I made the second half of the rough shell mold for the lower leg. I used the same cardboard coddle from the first half to pour the second half. A soap parting agent was used as a separator.






Here, the lower leg has been removed from the mold half. I will be enlarge the spare by carving with a knife. I use a SurForm tool to bevel the edges of the mold.






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Thursday, December 16, 2010

Rough Shell Mold of Lower Leg Part 1




I try to do a little work on my doll every day. Little by little, it all adds up. I'm figuring it out as I go along. Today I started working on the rough shell mold for the old lower leg. I traced around the lower leg onto a piece of cereal box cardboard, then cut it out, and trimmed it until the cardboard fit around the leg. I used the cardboard cutout as a build-up. I fastened the cardboard cutout to the leg with some wax pellets, then put some coils of oil clay around the bottom of the build-up to fill in the spaces. I made a coddle from some more cardboard, and taped it together with some masking tape. Then I put some pieces of 2x2 around the edges and put a rubber band around everything to hold it together. I mixed the plaster 2:3, water to plaster, let the plaster slack, then mixed it by hand until it was creamy. I turned on the vibrator and poured the plaster. I got the first half of the mold done today. Here's a picture of the first half. Happy, Happy, Joy, Joy.






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