Monday, January 31, 2011

More Latching




Today I latched the second row of yarn to the wig cap, and started on the third row. The latch tool makes it easier, but I am still awkward doing it. This is good practice for making a wig with synthetic hair.






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Sunday, January 30, 2011

Latching The Yarn Wig



I found a latch tool at the discount store for $0.99 cents the other day. I'm going to try and use it to latch the yarn to the wig cap. The first thing I need to do is make some lengths of yarn. I use a book to do this by wrapping the yarn around the book, then cutting it on one side with some scissors.





Once the yarn is cut, I need to un-ply it. This is Caron 4-ply worsted weight acrylic yarn. I use a clothes pin as a weight to help un-ply the yarn. The clothes pin grabs about 3mm of the end of the yarn.





Next grab 2 plies in one hand and 2 plies in the other hand, and gently pull them apart. The clothes pin rotates and keeps the plies from knotting up. Then do the same thing with each of the 2-ply pieces of yarn.





I end up with four pieces of 1-ply yarn.





I am latching 2 plies of yarn, doubled over. The resulting knot has 4 plies.





I push the latch tool through a strand of yarn on the wig cap so that the latch goes back. Then I grab the middle of the doubled over 2-plies of yarn with the hook.





When I pull the yarn through, the latch is caught by the strand of yarn, and it closes, so I can easily pull the yarn through.





Then I make the latch go back with the loop of 2-ply yarn, which is on one side of the latch, and I grab the middle of the 4-plies with the hook.





When I pull the 4-plies through the loop, the latch closes, and I pull the 4 plies all the way through the loop, making a knot.





Here is the knot of yarn in the wig cap, with the resulting 4 strands of 1-ply yarn.





Here, the first row of yarn has been added to the wig cap, all the way around.





This is the latch tool with the latch open.


This is continued until the wig cap has been filled with yarn.




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Saturday, January 29, 2011

Cleanup




Post mold making clean-up. This is the before picture.






This is the after picture.






Also, I carefully clean the plaster from the oil-clay and make it ready to use again.



Reminder: Always clean plaster tools in a bucket of water. Never put any plaster, dry, set, or wet, in the drainpipes. Later, after all the plaster in the water bucket has settled to the bottom of the bucket, the plaster-free water can be scooped out and flushed. The plaster goop at the bottom of the bucket can be scooped out, wrapped in newspapers, and thrown away.




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Friday, January 28, 2011

In The Molding Studio Again



Note: I started this post in the morning, and added new photos throughout the day. If you read the post early, you may have missed the rest of the post. :D

Today I am in the plaster molding studio again. I'm working on a plaster rough shell mold of the left upper leg. These pictures show several views of the oil-clay spare.












Next, I cut out a cereal box cardboard build-up and stuck it on the leg at the parting line with some oil-clay. I put some clay under the leg to keep it from rolling around.






Then I applied the soap separator (1 part liquid soap to 1 part water) with a soft brush.






I mixed plaster and applied it over the leg and build-up. I mixed small amounts of 0.50 lbs of water to 0.75 pounds of plaster, mixed it by hand, and applied it by hand, patting it gently so it would go into all the details. It took three batches to make this half of the mold (1.5 lbs of water to 2.25 lbs of plaster, total). Here it is with the first batch applied.






When that set up, I turned it over and removed the cardboard build-up and the clay.








Next, I carved registration keys, and applied the soap separator to all plaster surfaces, and some to the doll part as well.






Then I reused the pizza box cardboard coddle from the last mold. It was still good for one more go. I mixed more plaster and poured the second half of the mold with the vibrator running. This time I mixed 1.0 lbs of water to 1.5 lbs of plaster.






Here, the second half of the mold has set up. I have already removed the cardboard coddle.





I opened the mold with a knife and hammer, then removed the wax original, Because I put some soap separator on the wax original, it will clean up easily in some water.






Finally I beveled the edges of the mold, using a Surform tool.



The last thing I do is put some bands around the mold, so it will not warp, then store it in a nice dry place.




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Thursday, January 27, 2011

Sculpture Terminology for BJDs






I don't know how, or when it got started, but I see some people in the BJD community referring to a sculpt as a mold. Or, they refer to a casting as a mold. I am guessing that it all has to do with poor language translations from Japanese, Korean, and Chinese BJD makers, to English speaking BJD collectors?

A sculpt is a positive three dimensional form, originally modeled by the artist.
A mold is a negative of that three dimensional original form.
A casting is a positive three dimensional form that is removed from a mold.

A mold is made around a sculpt. When the sculpt is removed from the mold, an exact negative three dimensional shape of the sculpt is inside the mold.

A mold is used to reproduce the original sculpt as a casting.

When you buy a resin or porcelain BJD, you are buying a casting, that was removed from a mold, that was made from the original sculpt. If you buy an OOAK BJD, made from air-dry clay, polymer clay, or apoxie sculpt clay, you are buying an original one-of-a-kind sculpt.

It really does not matter how BJD collectors refer to the BJDs they purchase, but ball-jointed doll makers should use the proper sculpture terminology amongst themselves because it is a precise way to communicate about making BJDs.




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Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Free Doll Dressmaking Book






Today I found Absolute Beginners Vol.1 by Seraphim Grace. It is available as a free download. Here is the link:
A Guide to Doll Dressmaking.

Click the File Download link under the Add To Cart button. Then click the Download button. 807835.pdf is the name of the file. It is 538972 bytes.

This 30+ pages book is aimed at absolute beginners to sewing by hand, and also has very basic introductions to knitting and crocheting. There is a glossary of terms in the back of the book. It also shows how to make several different articles of clothing for your doll. Found at DoA.




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Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Dress Form Measurements Nº 3




Taking the measurements.

Evidently, dress form measurements are taken in a specific order, which is usually memorized. Since I am not planning on being a full-time tailor, I will use these notes to remember with.



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html


All the vertical measurements are taken on the same side of the dress form, front and back.

  1. Center Bodice Length: A to B. 12 cm.



  2. Full Bodice Length: C through G to line B-F. 16.2 cm.



  3. Across Measurement: Taken on the chest between A and G, at about the middle of the arm socket, from the edge of the arm socket to the line A-B. 6 cm.



  4. Shoulder Point Width: Put the tape on D-D, and measure straight across to from D to line A-B. 6.5 cm.





Taken in small steps, these measurements are not as complicated as trying to learn all of them at once.




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Monday, January 24, 2011

A Wig Tutorial For Everyone



Today I was at the Den of Angels' Workshop > Sewing, Wigs and Jewelry Making, etc. topic, and found this wonderful link to a Yarn Wig Tutorial at Flickr. This tutorial explains exactly how to make a BJD wig, the way I want to make one! Many thanks to Teadesu from Estonia, for pointing to this link.

Teadesu also has a very nice tutorial on DoA about making a Halterneck ruffles - Top ||TUTORIAL ADDED|| . This tutorial shows how to take the measurements of your BJD, translate them into a flat paper pattern, then sew the pattern to make a gorgeous halter top with ruffles. After reading more of her posts, I found out that Teadesu went to school to learn sewing, and is technically qualified to be a full time tailor.

It is so wonderful to find so many talented people in the BJD community willing to share their expertise!




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Sunday, January 23, 2011

Wig Ventilating Experiment




Today I started experimenting with ventilating a wig. I guess that is the correct way to say it? Ventilating a wig means to tie knots of hair into the wig cap. I tried some wool roving first. The wool roving I have does not have long enough fibers for the type of wig I want. Next I tried unraveling some 4-ply yarn. I can control the length of the hair this way, but the strands of yarn are too thick for a wig.






I used a small steel crochet hook for a ventilating tool.



Here is a tutorial at Den of Angels about using yarn to ventilate a wig.
(You need to be a registered member of DoA to view the tutorial.)




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Saturday, January 22, 2011

Dress Form Measurements Nº 2




The measurement points.



From Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




The measurement points on the dress form. A, B, and G are the same on the front and back. A is the neckline. I marked mine at the pit of the neck. B is the center waist mid-point. G is the bust point (shoulder blade in back.






E is the arm pit. F is the side waist mid-point. H is the side hip mid-point.






C is the neck shoulder point. D is the shoulder tip point.











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