Monday, February 28, 2011

A Work-In-Progress




Pictured on the left, in the tray, is the brown microcrystalline wax, work-in-progress ball-jointed doll. On the right is the carving wax test stringing BJD, without arms, hands, or feet.







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Sunday, February 27, 2011

Goth-Loli Patterns




Today I accidentally found this link to some patterns, one of which looks very close to a Sailor Fuku that I would like to make for Aalish. I know that making clothes for my doll comes much later in the doll making process, but I always keep an eye out for things I may need later on.




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Friday, February 25, 2011

A Plastic Neck Button




I found a small piece of plastic, cut for a bulk-head fitting from a 500-gallon cistern, recently installed in the backyard for rainwater harvesting. Using a hole saw in the drill press, I was able to cut three small plastic disks from that piece of scrap plastic. I used a sander, a file, and an X-Acto knife to make a practice neck button for the carving wax test doll.






This is the neck button I made from one of the plastic disks. I don't have any S-hooks yet, so I used a key-ring instead. The result is that the head seems to have more range-of-motion than before, when only a piece of scrap silicone rubber was holding the elastic in the head.






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Thursday, February 24, 2011

Neck Button




Lately I've been thinking about how to distribute the tension at the neck joint. One thing I am thinking about is a Neck Button. A neck button has a hole in the center, and some grooves in the top. The elastic cord comes up through the neck, into the head, through the center hole in the neck button, and is fastened to the S-hook. The S-hook sits in some shallow grooves in the neck button, and the force of the tensioning is distributed over the whole area of the neck button, instead of at the hole in the bottom of the head that fits over the neck. This is something I'm thinking about. I do not know if it will work, yet.







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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Plaster Mold Repair




I recently read a post on a forum where a doll maker expressed concern over losing a master doll part due to it getting locked in a plaster mold half. Plaster is a rigid mold material, so if the molder does not make the mold half to the correct parting line, the master doll part can get locked in the plaster mold half. However, like I always say, if you can make it, you can usually fix it. In the case of a master doll part getting locked in a mold half, one solution is to cut the mold half with a saw until it is about 1/4 inch (6mm) from the master. Then use wooden wedges and a hammer to split the mold half. The master doll part can then be easily freed from the mold half that it was locked into.



Plaster mold making is a craft skill. The more plaster molds you make, the better you get at making plaster molds. Become familiar with the properties of plaster. Establish good working habits, and follow them. Remember to carve registration keys. Apply a parting agent. Always add plaster to water. A 2:3 ratio of water to plaster is a very good consistency for slip casting molds. Make sure the spare is large enough to allow you to empty the mold when the slip has thickened in the mold. Never put any plaster (dry, wet, or set) in the drain pipes.




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Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Standing




The carving wax test stringing standing.



It is going to take much longer for me to figure out how all these joints work together when under elastic tensioning. I have so much to learn. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day, but even on the best of days, I can only work on her part-time. Getting all these joints to work together is much more difficult than I thought it would be!




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Monday, February 21, 2011

Drafting The Back Bodice Nº 6

Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper

Using the measurements taken from the dress form, the back bodice sloper is drawn according to the following diagram. The drawing to fit the BJD will be made, step-by-step. There are about 31 steps to drafting the back bodice sloper, in Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin (1942).



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




Read each step carefully!

28. J-8 -- Connect points J and 8.






29. J-7 -- Connect points J and 7.






30. With the aid of the curve as shown in accompanying diagram, complete the back neckline and the armscye of the draft. Curve may have to be adjusted to complete armscye. It is merely a guide.








31. With blue pencil, trace around your finished draft as follows:

Using curve tool for neckline and armscye A-B-G-F-I-H-10-C-6-7-J-8-A






32. The finished back bodice.



Check your draft carefully and check it against the bodice front draft at the shoulder seams and side seams. It should resemble the diagram in general proportions.

With this practice in the use of measurements, you are ready to measure your model form, record the measurements in the space provided in the chart and then use them to produce the draft and the muslin proof.




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Sunday, February 20, 2011

Drafting The Back Bodice Nº 5

Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper

Using the measurements taken from the dress form, the back bodice sloper is drawn according to the following diagram. The drawing to fit the BJD will be made, step-by-step. There are about 31 steps to drafting the back bodice sloper, in Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin (1942).



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




Read each step carefully!

23. F-G -- Connect points F and G.






24. F-I -- Connect points F and I.






25. Check the length of lines F-G and F-I to be sure they are of equal length. Make the required correction as shown by dotted line.






26. Because the side bodice length measurement was used to establish point 10 and the new side seam H-10 was later established, it is important to check the line H-10 to make sure it equals the original side bodice length measurement. Such correction should be made at point H. (As the side seam will meet the side seam of the bodice front, it must be identical in length.)






27. J -- Locate this point 3 1/2 inches downward from point 8 in a position which is parallel to the center back line A-B. Label point J. Aalish is a 1/3 scale BJD, so 1/3 of 3.5 inches is about 3 cm.






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Saturday, February 19, 2011

Drafting The Back Bodice Nº 4

Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper

Using the measurements taken from the dress form, the back bodice sloper is drawn according to the following diagram. The drawing to fit the BJD will be made, step-by-step. There are about 31 steps to drafting the back bodice sloper, in Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin (1942).



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




Read each step carefully!

17. B-G -- B-G is equal in length to E-F less one-half inch and is squared from line B-A at point B. Label point G. (This determines angle of back waistline dart. When an individual is being measured, this should be determined with the tapeline. The one-half inch is satisfactory for standard sizes.) Aalish is a 1/3 scale BJD, so 1/3 of 1/2 inch is about 4mm.






18. G-9 -- From point G, draw a line to connect points G and 9. (Line B-G-9 represents the unfitted waistline. Some of this excess will be used in the dart, the remainder will be taken off at the side seam.)






19. Measure line B-G-9. Jot that amount down. Subtract one-half the Back Waist Measurement from this amount. The difference represents the amount which must be thrown into a dart and taken off the side seam.



Divide this difference in half. (Should minute fractions be involved, you can take a strip of paper equal to the difference and fold it in half as a measuring agent.)




20. 9-H -- From point 9, measure off a distance on the line B-G-9 equal to one-half the strip of paper. Label that point H.






21. H-10 -- Draw a connecting line between points H and 10.






22. G-I -- From point G, measure to the right a distance equal to the remaining unused portion of the difference. Label point I.






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Friday, February 18, 2011

Drafting The Back Bodice Nº 3

Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper

Using the measurements taken from the dress form, the back bodice sloper is drawn according to the following diagram. The drawing to fit the BJD will be made, step-by-step. There are about 31 steps to drafting the back bodice sloper, in Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin (1942).



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




Read each step carefully!

12. C-9 -- From point C, measure off a line equal to the Shoulder Height Measurement, less the 4 inches just used to locate point C, to a point somewhere on line 5. Label 9.






13. 9-10 -- From point 9, measure upward along the guide line 5 a distance equal to the Side Bodice Length. Label this point 10.






14. 10-D -- From point 10, square a line which will intersect with guide line 4. Mark the intersection point D.






15. B-E -- From point B, measure upward on line B-A a distance equal to Shoulder Blade Height. (This is measurement number 12 which corresponds to bust height taken for front.) Mark point E.






16. E-F -- Square a line from point E equal to one-half the Shoulder Blade Width. (This is measurement number 13 which corresponds to bust point width in front.) Label point F.






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Thursday, February 17, 2011

Drafting The Back Bodice Nº 2

Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper

Using the measurements taken from the dress form, the back bodice sloper is drawn according to the following diagram. The drawing to fit the BJD will be made, step-by-step. There are about 31 steps to drafting the back bodice sloper, in Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin (1942).



From: Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, 1942. http://vintagesewing.info/1940s.html




Read each step carefully!

6. 2-5 -- From point 2, measure off a distance on this guide line equal to one-half the Full Bodice Width Measurement. Label this point 5.






7. Square guide lines extending downward from points 3, 4 and 5.





8. B-6 -- Starting at point B, measure a diagonal line which will fall somewhere on guide line 4 which is equal to the Shoulder Pitch Measurement. Label this point 6.






9. 6-7 -- From point 6, measure a line equal to the Shoulder Width Measurement to a point located somewhere on the line 2-3. Label this point 7.






10. A-8 -- From point A, measure a line equal to one-half the Back Neck Measurement, less 1/8 inch to a point somewhere on the line 2-3. Mark this point 8. The remaining distance between points 8 and 7 represents the amount to be used for the control dart for the curve of the shoulders. Because a curved line will be made to substitute for the guide neckline 8-A, the 1/8 inch is deducted to make allowance for that fact. Since Aalish is a 1/3 scale BJD, the 1/8 inch mentioned above is about one third of 1/8 inch, or 1.5 mm






11. 6-C -- From point 6, measure downward 4 inches to a point somewhere on guide line 3. Label this point C. Connect points 6 and C with a straight guide line.






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