Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Muñecas De Cartón




I have finished reading Dona Z. Meilach's papier mâché artistry, and have more or less internalized the materials and methods of making something from papier mâché. However, I keep coming across these Muñecas De Cartón, which were popular in México from 1880 to 1960, more or less. From what I understand, fewer and fewer of these dolls, also known as Lupitas, are being made each year.



Image source: www.uv.mx


These dolls are traditionally made and are available around Easter time each year. Girls receive a Lupita doll, and boys receive a stick horse, with a papier mâché head. The dolls have articulated arms and legs. Their hair is usually painted black, and they have blue or green eyes with big eyelashes. Their cheeks are rosy. The traditional dress is a 1920's style bathing suit, as they are made today.

It seems that these dolls are made using molds. I have mentioned these molds in this post. The old molds, themselves, are unusual works of art.

What I have learned in the papier mâché book is that a mold must have a separator applied, such as Vaseline, before applying the layers of paper and glue. Also, it is a good idea to use a softer glue, such as wheat paste, next to the mold, so that the finished papier mâché can be removed more easily from the mold. The other layers can be built-up with a harder glue. I ran across a reference that indicated that animal fat was used as a separator on the antique clay molds. Besides clay, plaster may also be used to make a doll mold for making papier mâché dolls.

I am very interested in trying to make some dolls using papier mâché. I am thinking that my first doll will be modeled in oil-clay, and a plaster mold will be made from that oil-clay original. There are different kinds of molds that can be used with papier mâché. With some molds, the paper layers are draped over the mold, or slumped into the mold. Several molds may be used to create complex shapes. Then the papier mâché parts are attached to each other with more paper layers and glue. Then there are the types of molds that are completely covered with paper and glue, and are later cut off the mold, then patched together again.

The main thing is that with papier mâché, there is no need for elaborate studio equipment, or materials. Really, the main thing that is needed for working with papier mâché is patience, because it does require a drying time between each step of the process.




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Tuesday, November 29, 2011

La Catrina




I first saw this exhibit at the museum of anthropology at a local university last week, before Thanksgiving. I was very impressed with some of the objects, especially the display case of La Catrina. Before I left, I asked if photographs were allowed, and was told that they were, as long as a flash was not used. Today I got a chance to return to the museum and take some snapshots. I sure wish I had a better camera, but I must admit that this little Nikon point-and-shoot camera is much better than my old Canon digital camera. Here are some snapshots of the La Catrina display case, with the largest objects. Unfortunately, there were not any descriptions of the objects, themselves. I am guessing that the large couple is made from papier-mâché, and the smaller figures are made from ceramics? The large couple is about as large as my doll is going to be. Click on any image to enlarge it.

This is a close-up of the couple's heads.






This is a full length snapshot of the whole display case.






This is a close-up of the description of the display.






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Monday, November 28, 2011

Papier Mâché




I have always thought of papier-mâché as a lower art form with an oatmeal texture, poorly proportioned, and overall, somewhat crude. Lately though, I have seen some examples of papier-mâché on the Internet which have started to change my mind about what can be done with the medium. So I found this book at my local Public Library, and checked it out, hoping to get some ideas of some recipes for making the paste, and some techniques for using it.



papier-mâché artistry.
Dona Z. Meilach.
NY: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1971.
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 78-147334

I am also familiar with Ultimate Paper Mache, a website by Jonni Good, who has been making papier-mâché sculpture for over 50 years. There are Paper Mache Recipes on the website. Her Paper Mache Clay looks like it is easy to make, and may be an inexpensive substitute for commercially available paper clay. She is the self-published author of her own book, Make Animal Sculptures With Paper Mache Clay, and there is also a 43 page booklet available on her site titled: Practical Paper Mache, authored by readers of her website.

My own ideas of what to make with papier-mâché range from 1/3rd scale furniture for my 60cm BJD WIP, to sculpture, both full-sized and doll-sized. I am excited about learning how to work with materials and methods that are so readily available, inexpensive, and that do not require any special tools. I am looking forward to becoming familiar with this material, and the methods of using it. I already have some ideas for some whimsical furniture that I can custom make for Aalish when she is finished.




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Sunday, November 27, 2011

Inspiration Stuff




Today I typed doll sculpture into Google and found all sorts of strange and wonderful things, among them, Steampunk Beetle Rider by Nicole Taylor. There is a whole series of detail photos, plus some work-in-progress pix as well. Just keep clicking on Next.






The other strange and wonderful thing I found was a surrealist video by The Quay Brothers, called Street Of Crocodiles (1986), in two parts, at YouTube:

Street Of Crocodiles, Part 1
Street Of Crocodiles, Part 2




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Saturday, November 26, 2011

Knitting Patterns




I am very excited to find out that I should be able to use human-sized knitting patterns as written to make clothes for the 60cm BJD (Aalish) that I am working on. The trick is to use fingering weight yarn or lace weight yarn and smaller needles. I found this out at Ravelry, in the ABJD Knitting and Crochet Group. According to those who have done this, only minor adjustments need to be made, usually because a BJD is more slender and has a slightly longer torso than a human does. I already have several knitting pattern books in my studio library, so I am prepared. The idea of making a sweater, or other article of clothing does not seem so daunting at 1/3rd scale.



Adolphe William Bougereau painted The Knitting Girl in 1869





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Friday, November 25, 2011

Minor Pattern Alterations




Minor alterations for doll clothes patterns are done the same way as human sized patterns. The pattern may be divided horizontally and/or vertically, and either separated to make an alteration larger, or overlapped to make the alteration smaller.



Bodice #1 shows where the bodice may be cut into halves or quarters.
Bodice #2 shows the pattern moved apart to make a larger pattern.
Bodice #3 shows that the cuts may not be parallel for some alterations.
Bodice #4 shows that the cut pattern pieces may be overlapped to make it smaller.

Sleeve #1 shows where the sleeve may be cut into halves or quarters.
Sleeve #2 shows the pattern pieces moved apart to make the sleeve larger.
Sleeve #3 shows the pattern pieces overlapped to make the sleeve smaller.




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Thursday, November 24, 2011

Progress Photo




This is a progress photo of Aalish. She has sixteen doll parts (if I count the skull cap of the head as a doll part). So I only have fourteen more doll parts to mold and cast into carving wax.



Happy Thanksgiving !!!




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Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Sewing For 20th Century Dolls




I found this book at the local used-book emporium today. It is full of fashion patterns for all kinds of dolls, covering fashions from the 1900s to the 1970s. I am very happy to have found this book, as it is in a like-new condition.



Sewing For 20th Century Dolls: 100 Plus Projects.
Johana Gast Anderton.
Grantsville, MD: Hobby House Press, Inc., 1972 (3rd printing, 1996).
ISBN: 0875884679

From the back cover:

Make 115 authentic doll clothing projects to dress your 20th century dolls. Ideal for every doll dressmaker, doll collector, hospital, and costume enthusiast, Sewing for 20th Century Dolls provides you with all the vital designing, decorating, and making knowledge! Full-size patterns, based on original clothes found on old dolls, allow you to create authentic costumes for a variety of dolls. Fashion sketches organized by decades from 1900 through 1971, along with a great deal of background material make this book a must for fashion composition and identification.

With 115 doll projects, you can make classic fashions for your dolls -- cardigans, blazers, nautical costumes, shirt-waist dresses, hats and other hair accessories, stockings and shoes -- with complete patterns and detailed stitching guide.





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Monday, November 21, 2011

Brown Wax Upper Legs Nº 4




This is a side view of what the leg looks like at this point. It has a single knee joint that can bend at about a 90 degree angle. The socket of the upper leg does not have any angles cut into the back of it, but is a full circle in contact with the ball of the lower leg. The ball of the lower leg is attached to the lower leg.







If the socket is deep, then the range of motion is less, but there is more contact area on the ball joint. If the socket is more shallow, there is more range of motion, but less contact area. I am going to guess that there is an optimum balance of the two, somewhere in there.



One other thing to keep in mind is that Martha Armstrong-Hand cast her carving wax doll parts without balls and sockets. She had other plaster ball molds to cast the carving wax balls which she welded to the doll parts, then carved the sockets. My doll parts have the balls cast in carving wax , attached to the parts. So I have to remember that I may have to cut the balls off the doll parts, and reposition them, if they do not work where I modeled them in brown wax.




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Sunday, November 20, 2011

Brown Wax Upper Legs Nº 3




How does this look? This is the other upper leg and the upper arm connected as the lower leg. Interesting. This actually works better than what I was doing yesterday. Yeah, right?






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Saturday, November 19, 2011

Brown Wax Upper Legs Nº 2




I have filled in the back of one upper leg, and modified the lower leg so the legs can bend at 90 degrees. I also filled in the socket of the upper leg, so the ball on the lower leg would not go so far into it. The center of the ball on the lower leg was moved back as well. I am trying something different.






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Friday, November 18, 2011

Brown Wax Upper Legs Nº 1




I am going to start modeling on the brown wax upper legs. These are some photos of how the legs are before I start modeling on them. I am taking some photos of different views of the legs. This is the front view. Click on any image to enlarge it.






This is a side view.






This is the back view.






This is a view of the knee sockets, with the legs propped-up in the wax pot.



I have a lot of work to do before I make molds to cast carving wax.




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Thursday, November 17, 2011

BJD Boots Making Tutorial




Image Source


I found this very excellent tutorial about making boots for a ball jointed doll at Deviant Art.

Making boots for BJD tutorial by ~scargeear.

The pattern for the boots she made is here:

BJD Boots Pattern by ~scargeear

This is a very fine pair of boots !!! All the pieces are cut so cleanly, and the skill level is very high, indeed. I did a little research, and found out why her boots are so well made:

From ~scargeear's Profile at Deviant Art:

I will be posting some tutors on making accessories for BJD and other BJD related info. The first tutor will be on making BJD boots. I have an experience on making human-size boots in the past (see my Leather, woodwork, epoxy sculptures section), and I also have a magister degree in organization of shoemaking industry. This tutorial accumulated many information from different sources and my own experience and how-tos.


So, does ~scargeear do any Commission work?

In other news, this is what Revolution looks like:






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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Free Knitting Patterns





Image Source


I love to read knitting patterns, and I found some free patterns for knitting doll clothes at Dolls West Designs:

Free Pattern Archives

Additional Free Patterns

Free Quarterly Pattern

I also found a free pattern for a knit wig cap at Ravelry.Com. Ravelry is a knitting and crochet community that is simply fabulous.

Basic Knit Doll Wig Cap

Here is Carving Wax Test Doll wearing the yarn wig I made using a crocheted wig cap.



I am better at knitting than crochet, so I am very happy to find the knit wig cap pattern.




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Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Pin Cushion !!!




Carving Wax Test Doll is holding a vintage red tomato pin cushion, gifted to me from my BFF !!!






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Monday, November 14, 2011

Recommended Books






There is a list of recommended books in the book, Learning To Be A Doll Artist, by Martha Armstrong-Hand. The list is quite long, and there are some mistakes in the spellings of titles and authors. While I have tried my very best to correct the errors I found, some others may have crept in during my editing, so use this list at your own risk!

Some of the books are now out-of-print, but they may be available through your local Public Library. I have added as much publishing information as I could find, from Amazon.Com, and WorldCat, or from doing a Google search. There was one book that I could not find at all, and I noted it. I could not find very much at all for any of the listed videos; however there are now quite a few good videos at YouTube about making dolls.

I suggest that you go to Amazon.Com and at least read the customer reviews of a book, if there are any, before ordering it. If you want to find an out-of-print book, a very good used-book search engine is at http://used.addall.com/.




Anatomy




Anatomy and Perspective.
Charles Oliver.
Viking Press

* Paperback: 96 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (April 2, 2004)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486435407
* ISBN(13): 978-0486435404
* Dimensions: 10.6 x 8 x 0.3 inches
* Weight: 8.8 ounces




Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist.
Stepen Roger Peck.
Oxford University Press

* Paperback: 272 pages
* Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (February 18, 1982)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0195030958
* ISBN(13): 978-0195030952
* Dimensions: 10 x 7.4 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 1.3 pounds




Body Watching.
Desmond Morris.
Crown Publishers

* Hardcover: 256 pages
* Publisher: Random House Value Publishing; 1st Edition. edition (October 12, 1985)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0517558149
* ISBN(13): 978-0517558140
* Dimensions: 11.3 x 8.8 x 1.1 inches
* Weight: 3 pounds




Human Anatomy for Artists: The Elements of Form.
Eliot Goldfinger.
Oxford University Press

* Hardcover: 368 pages
* Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (November 7, 1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0195052064
* ISBN(13): 978-0195052060
* Dimensions: 12.1 x 8.9 x 1 inches
* Weight: 3.6 pounds




Drawing




Draw From Your Head.
Doug Jamieson.
Watson-Guptill Publications

* Hardcover: 192 pages
* Publisher: Watson-Guptill (October 1, 1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 082301374X
* ISBN(13): 978-0823013746
* Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.3 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 1.8 pounds




Drawing the Human Head.
Burne Hogarth.
Watson-Guptill Publications

* Paperback: 160 pages
* Publisher: Watson-Guptill (February 1, 1989)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0823013766
* ISBN(13): 978-0823013760
* Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.5 inches
* Weight: 2 pounds




Drawing With Lee Ames.
Lee Ames.
Doubleday

* Paperback: 272 pages
* Publisher: Main Street Books; 1st edition (August 1, 1990)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0385237014
* ISBN(13): 978-0385237017
* Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.4 x 0.7 inches
* Weight: 1.6 pounds




The Figure: An Artist's Approach to Drawing and Construction.
compiled by Walt Reed.
Watson-Guptill Publications

* Hardcover: 143 pages
* Publisher: distributed by Watson-Guptill Publications (1976)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0891340068
* ISBN(13): 978-0891340065
* Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.1 x 1 inches
* Weight: 2.2 pounds




Master Class in Figure Drawing.
compiled by Robert Beverly Hale.
Watson-Guptill Publications

* Paperback: 144 pages
* Publisher: Watson-Guptill Publications (September 1, 1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0823030148
* ISBN(13): 978-0823030149
* Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.2 x 0.5 inches
* Weight: 1 pounds




Sculpture




Modeling the Figure In Clay.
sculpture by Bruno Lucchesi, text by Margit Malmstrom.
Watson-Guptill Publications

* Hardcover: 144 pages
* Publisher: Watson-Guptill (April 1, 1980)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0823030970
* ISBN(13): 978-0823030972
* Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.4 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 1.6 pounds




Modeling a Likeness In Clay.
Daisy Grubbs.
Watson-Guptill

* Hardcover: 160 pages
* Publisher: Watson-Guptill (August 1, 1982)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0823030946
* ISBN(13): 978-0823030941
* Dimensions: 11.3 x 8.6 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 2.1 pounds




Sculpture Inside and Out.
Malvina Hoffman.
NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 1939.

* Hardcover: 330 pages
* Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company (1939)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A
* ISBN(13): N/A
* Dimensions: 10.3 x 7.3 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 2.0 pounds




Sculpture Principles and Practice.
Louis Slobodkin.
Dover Publications

* Paperback: 255 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (June 1, 1973)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486229602
* Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.1 x 0.7 inches
* Weight: 1.5 pounds




Stage Make Up.
Richard Corson.
Prentice Hall

* Hardcover: 389 pages
* Publisher: Englewood Cliffs, N.J. : Prentice-Hall, 1986.
* ISBN(10): 0138405212
* ISBN(13): 9780138405212
* Dimensions: 29 cm




Zorach Explains Sculpture: What It Means and How It Is Made.
William Zorach.
NY: Tudor Publishing Co., 1960.

* Paperback: 306 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications; Dover ed edition (April 1996)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486290484
* ISBN(13): 978-0486290485
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 1.2 pounds




Mold Making




The Materials and Methods of Sculpture.
Jack C. Rich.
Oxford University Press, 1947.
(Chapter 4: "Plaster of Paris" through
"Cleaning Old Casts," pages 57-72.
See also "Storing Plaster," pages 88-89.)

* Paperback: 512 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications; 10th edition (October 1, 1988)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486257428
* ISBN(13): 978-0486257426
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 1.7 pounds




Kilns and Firing




Ceramics for the Artist Potter.
F.H. Norton.
Addison Wesley Publishing

* Hardcover: 320 pages
* Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company Inc (1957)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A
* Dimensions: 27 cm




Ceramics.
Glenn Nelson.
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

* Paperback: 331 pages
* Publisher: Holt Rinehart & Winston; 2nd edition (February 2, 1966)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0030558905
* ISBN(13): 978-0030558900
* Dimensions: 9.6 x 7.1 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 1.6 pounds




Electric Kilns and Firing.
Harry Fraser.
The Pitman Press, 1980.

* Paperback: 90 pages
* Publisher: London : Pitman, 1980
* ISBN(10): 0273013939, 0273013947
* ISBN(13): 9780273013938, 9780273013945
* Dimensions: 21 cm




Stoneware and Porcelain: The Art of High Fired Pottery.
Daniel Rhodes.
Chilton Book Co.

* Paperback: 217 pages
* Publisher: Pennsylvania : Chilton Book Company, 1974.
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0801900980
* ISBN(13): 9780801900983
* Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.2 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 1.8 pounds




Porcelain




Painting China and Porcelain.
Sheila Southwell.
Blandford Press, Poole, Dorset

* Paperback: 128 pages
* Publisher: David & Charles (March 1998)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0715307231
* ISBN(13): 978-0715307236
* Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
* Weight: 4.8 ounces




Porcelain the Elite of Ceramics.
Ronald Serfass.
NY: Crown Publishers, Inc.

* Hardcover: 191 pages
* Publisher: Crown Publishers; 1st THUS edition (June 13, 1984)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0517536218
* ISBN(13): 978-0517536216
* Dimensions: 10.1 x 7.3 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 1.4 pounds




Painting




How to Paint Eyes.
Sharon Kinzie.
Livonia, MI: Scott Publications

* Paperback
* Publisher: Scott Pubns (July 1989)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0916809358
* ISBN(13): 978-0916809355
* Dimensions: 10.6 x 8.1 x 0.1 inches
* Weight: 13.6 ounces




Hair




The Handbook of Doll Repair and Restoration.
Marty Westfall
NY: Crown Publishers

* Paperback: 288 pages
* Publisher: Three Rivers Press; 1 edition (August 19, 1997)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0517887355
* ISBN(13): 978-0517887356
* Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.9 inches
* Weight: 1.2 pounds




Clothing and the History of Costume




Children's Costume in America, 1607-1910.
Estelle Ansely Worrell.
NY: Charles Scribners and Sons

* Hardcover: 216 pages
* Publisher: Scribner (December 1980)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0684166453
* ISBN(13): 978-0684166452
* Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.9 inches
* Weight: 1.6 pounds




Corsets and Crinolines.
Norah Waugh.
NY: Theatre Arts Books

* Paperback: 176 pages
* Publisher: Routledge (December 1990)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0878305262
* ISBN(13): 978-0878305261
* Dimensions: 11.6 x 8.7 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 1 pounds




Costume and Pattern Design.
Max Tilke.
Rizzoli International Publications, 1990.
[Originally published: New York: Hastings House, 1974].

* Hardcover: 177 pages
* Publisher: Hastings House (1974)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0803811918
* ISBN(13): 978-0803811911
* Dimensions:
* Weight:




The Cut of Men's Clothes: (1600-1900).
Norah Waugh.
NY: Theatre Arts Books

* Hardcover: 192 pages
* Publisher: Theatre Arts Books; 1 edition (January 7, 1987)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0878300252
* ISBN(13): 978-0878300259
* Dimensions: 10 x 7.7 x 0.7 inches
* Weight: 1.3 pounds




The Cut of Women's Clothes: (1600-1930).
Norah Waugh.
NY: Theatre Arts Books

* Hardcover: 394 pages
* Publisher: Routledge (January 7, 1987)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0878300260
* ISBN(13): 978-0878300266
* Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.4 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 3 pounds




Dress and Undress: A History of Women's Underwear.
Elizabeth Ewing.
London: B.T. Batsford Ltd.

* Paperback: 192 pages
* Publisher: Drama Pub (November 1989)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0713416300
* ISBN(13): 978-0713416305
* Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.4 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 1.4 pounds




Dress in North America: The New World, 1492-1800.
Diana De Marla.
NY: Holmes and Meier

* Hardcover: 240 pages
* Publisher: Holmes & Meier Pub (February 1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0841911991
* ISBN(13): 978-0841911994
* Dimensions: 10.3 x 7 x 0.9 inches
* Weight: 1.8 pounds




The Encyclopedia of World Costume.
Doreen Yarwood.
Bonanza Books Publishing
Distributed by Crown Publishers

* Hardcover: 471 pages
* Publisher: Bonanza Books; Reprint edition (May 25, 1988)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0517619431
* ISBN(13): 978-0517619438
* Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
* Weight: 1.4 pounds

Dover Reprint:

* Paperback: 480 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (June 16, 2011)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486433803
* ISBN(13): 978-0486433806
* Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.3 x 1.3 inches
* Weight: 3 pounds




Fashion, The Mirror of History.
Michael and Adriane Batterberry.
Greenwich House
Distributed by Crown Publishers

* Hardcover: 400 pages
* Publisher: Greenwich House / Crown Publishers (December 2, 1987)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0517388812
* ISBN(13): 978-0517388815
* Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.4 x 1.4 inches
* Weight: 4.6 pounds




Five Centuries of American Costume.
R. Turner Wilcox.
NY: Charles Scribners and Sons

* Paperback: 224 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (July 23, 2004)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486436101
* ISBN(13): 978-0486436104
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 13.6 ounces




Historic Costumes in Pictures.
Braun and Schneider.
NY: Dover Publications, Inc.

* Paperback
* Publisher: Dover Publications; 1ST edition (1975)
* ISBN(10): N/A
* Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.8 x 0.5 inches
* Weight: 9.6 ounces




Kostümgeschichte in Bildern. [History of Costumes in Pictures.]
Wolfgang Bruhn and Max Tilke.
Verlag Ernst Wasmuth, 1941.
(German Publishers - look for translation)

* Hardcover
* Publisher: Orbis (January 1, 2001)
* Language: German
* ISBN(10): 3572012317
* ISBN(13): 978-3572012312
* Dimensions: 12.4 x 9.4 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 3.6 pounds

Dover Reprint:

A Pictorial History of Costume From Ancient Times to the Nineteenth Century:
With Over 1900 Illustrated Costumes, Including 1000 in Full Color.

Wolfgang Bruhn, Max Tilke.

* Paperback: 176 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (July 23, 2004)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486435423
* ISBN(13): 978-0486435428
* Dimensions: 12.2 x 9.1 x 0.5 inches
* Weight: 1.8 pounds




20,000 Years of Fashion: The History of Costume and Personal Adornment.
Francois Boucher.
NY: Harry N. Abrams Publishers, Inc., 1973.

* Hardcover
* Publisher: Harry N Abrams (January 1973)
* ISBN(10): 0810900564
* ISBN(13): 978-0810900561
* Dimensions: 11.7 x 8.7 x 2 inches
* Weight: 5.6 pounds




History of Children's Costume.
Elizabeth Ewing.
NY: Charles Scribners and Sons

* Hardcover
* Publisher: BIBLIOPHILE; reprint edition (1982)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A




Patterns of Fashion 1: Englishwomen's Dresses & Their Construction C. 1660-1860.
Janet Arnold.
Drama Book Specialists Publishers

* Paperback: 76 pages
* Publisher: Drama Publishers; Revised edition (December 1977)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 089676026X
* ISBN(13): 978-0896760264
* Dimensions: 14.3 x 10.4 x 0.2 inches
* Weight: 14.4 ounces




Patterns of Fashion 2: Englishwomen's Dresses & Their Construction C. 1860-1940.
Janet Arnold.
Drama Book Specialists Publishers

* Paperback: 88 pages
* Publisher: Drama Publishers; 3rd edition (December 1977)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0896760278
* ISBN(13): 978-0896760271
* Dimensions: 14.3 x 10.3 x 0.2 inches
* Weight: 1.3 pounds




Sewing




The Complete Book of Needle Craft.
Janet Kirkwood, Ilse Gray, Lindsay Vernon, Elizabeth Ashurst, Margaret Maino.
NY: Exeter Books

* Hardcover: 352 pages
* Publisher: Exeter Books, New York; First edition. edition (February 1984)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0671060627
* ISBN(13): 978-0671060626
* Dimensions: 11 x 8.9 x 1.2 inches
* Weight: 4 pounds




Claire Shaeffer's Fabric Sewing Guide.
Claire Shaeffer.
Radnor, PA: Chilton Book Company

* Paperback: 543 pages
* Publisher: Chilton Book Co; 2 edition (December 1989)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0801978025
* ISBN(13): 978-0801978029
* Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.3 x 1.4 inches
* Weight: 3.2 pounds




Needle Work.
Claire Shaeffer.
Radnor, PA: Chilton Book Company

I could not find this book title anywhere.
However, I do have a copy of this book in my studio:

High-Fashion Sewing Secrets From The World's Best Designers:
A Step-byStep Guide to Sewing Stylish Seams, Buttonholes, Pockets, Collars, Hems, and More.

Claire B. Shaeffer.
Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, Inc., 1997.

* Hardcover: 246 pages
* Publisher: Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, Inc., 1997.
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0875967175
* Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.5 x 0.7 inches
* Weight: 2.4 pounds




The Reinhold Book of Needlecraft:
Embroidery, Crochet, Knitting, Weaving, Macrame, Applique,
Patchwork, and Many Other Handicraft Techniques, Old and New.

Jutta Lammèr.
New York, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1973.

* Hardcover: 296 pages
* Publisher: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co; FIRST EDITIION edition (1973)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0442246714
* ISBN(13): 978-0442246716
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.1 x 1.3 inches
* Weight: 2 pounds




Hat Making




From the Neck Up: An Illustrated Guide to Hatmaking.
Denise Dreher.
Minneapolis, MN: Madhatter Press, 1981.

* Perfect Paperback: 199 pages
* Publisher: Madhatter Press; 1st edition (December 1981)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0941082008
* ISBN(13): 978-0941082006
* Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.4 x 0.6 inches
* Weight: 1.3 pounds




The Hat Book: Creating Hats for Every Occasion.
Juliet Bawden.
Lark Books

* Paperback: 144 pages
* Publisher: Lark Books (1993)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0937274739
* ISBN(13): 978-0937274736
* Dimensions: 9.5 x 9 x 0.4 inches
* Weight: 1.2 pounds




The Mode in Hats and Headdress.
R. Turner Wilcox.
NY: Charles Scribners and Sons

* Hardcover: 366 pages
* Publisher: Charles Scribner's Sons; 1st Revised edition (1959)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A

Dover Reprint:

The Mode in Hats and Headdress: A Historical Survey with 198 Plates.
R. Turner Wilcox.

* Paperback: 368 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (November 24, 2008)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486467627
* ISBN(13): 978-0486467627
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 0.8 inches
* Weight: 1 pounds




Shoes




The Mode in Footwear.
R. Turner Wilcox.
NY: Charles Scribners and Sons

Dover Reprint:

The Mode in Footwear: A Historical Survey with 53 Plates.
R. Turner Wilcox.

* Paperback: 208 pages
* Publisher: Dover Publications (November 24, 2008)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0486467619
* ISBN(13): 978-0486467610
* Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 0.5 inches
* Weight: 9.9 ounces




Different Media Doll Artist Books




The Art of the Doll:
Contemporary Work of the National Institute of American Doll Artists.

Krystyna Poray Goddu; National Institute of American Doll Artists.
New York, NY : National Institute of American Doll Artists, 1992.

* Paperback: 171 pages
* Publisher: National Institute of American Doll Artists; 1st Edition/1st Printing 1992
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A
* Dimensions: 28 cm




The Basic Body, Soft Sculpture Techniques.
Lisa L. Lichtenfels.
Springfield, MA : L. Lichtenfels, 1995.

* Spiral-bound: 112 pages
* Publisher: L. Lichtenfels (1995)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A
* Dimensions: 28 cm




The Basic Head, Soft Sculpture Techniques.
Lisa L. Lichtenfels.
Springfield, MA: Rockfish Press.

* Spiral-bound: 60 pages
* Publisher: L. Lichtenfels (1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): N/A
* Dimensions: 28 cm




Dollmaking, One Artist's Approach.
Robert McKinley.
Richmond, VA: William Byrd Press

* Paperback: 167 pages
* Publisher: Mckinley Book (March 1991)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0962882100
* ISBN(13): 978-0962882104
* Dimensions: 10.2 x 7.2 x 0.4 inches
* Weight: 1.1 pounds




Fantastic Figures: Ideas and Techniques Using the New Clays.
Susanna Oroyan.
Lafayette, CA: C&T Publishing

* Paperback: 127 pages
* Publisher: C & T Publishing; First edition (January 1, 1995)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0914881000
* ISBN(13): 978-0914881001
* Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 0.4 inches
* Weight: 1.2 pounds




Sculpting Dolls in Paperclay.
Robert McKinley.
Livonia, MI: Scott Publications

* Paperback: 60 pages
* Publisher: Scott Publications; First edition (June 17, 1994)
* Language: English
* ISBN(10): 0916809781
* ISBN(13): 978-0916809782
* Dimensions: 11 x 8.4 x 0.3 inches
* Weight: 10.4 ounces




Videos




Presenting George Stuart: Sculptor, Entertainer, Historian.
(1 hour)




Presenting George Stuart: How the Historical Figures are made.
(2 hours)




Living Dolls, The Artistry of Martha Armstrong-Hand.
(1 hour)




Modeling a Child's Head with Dianna Effner.
(1 hour)








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Sunday, November 13, 2011

Wooden Fashion Mannequin




I first saw a copy of this image at Den of Angels, but couldn't find it again later when I wanted to look at it, so I am posting it here so I can find it again. This is a photo of French fashion designer Madeline Vionnet (1876-1975), draping a fully articulated wooden fashion mannequin, c.1923, in her studio.






This is another photo of her fashion mannequin, which she used to design clothing using the draping technique.






This is a fully articulated wooden doll, made in Germany c.1520.






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Saturday, November 12, 2011

Elbow Joints Nº 3




I unstrung the arms of Carving Wax Test Doll in order to fix the elbows. The wrist balls are the terminating joints. Each wrist ball has a pin in it, and a slot. An S-hook is attached to the wrist pin. The S-hook moves in the slot. To unstring the arms, I start by pulling one wrist ball away from the lower arm socket, then unhooking the elastic from the S-hook in the wrist. Then it is easy to remove all the arm parts and hands. I am using one loop of 1.5mm round elastic doll cord to tension the arms and hands.






I used my alcohol lamp and metal wax working tools to repair where I had carved away too much from the lower arms, around the elbow ball joints.






To restring the hands and arms, I attach one end of the elastic loop to the S-hook in the left hand. I use the restringing tool to pull the elastic through the arm parts.






Then I insert the tool through the upper torso, and pull the elastic through.






I pull the elastic through each arm part, then I hook the elastic to the S-hook in the right wrist. The repair job is finished, and the doll is restrung.






The carving wax is tough enough to be tensioned with elastic.






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