Saturday, November 3, 2012

07 Carving Wax Nº 4




This is an old photo of carving wax being worked on with metal wax tools and an alcohol lamp. This is a very low tech, affordable way of working with carving wax. The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting and smoothing repeatedly. ... Just like modeling in oil-clay, you can only do what you can see and understand. Keep the forms simple and basic, but in wax you have to finish or smooth the surface. (from Learning To Be A Doll Artist, page 55) Click on any image to enlarge it.






This is an old photo showing some surface blemishes on a carving wax upper torso.






The arrows point to some of the blemishes that need to be worked on.






Using metal wax working tools, heated with an alcohol lamp, and some small pieces of carving wax, the blemishes have been filled with carving wax.






After adding carving wax to fill the blemishes, I used a paring knife to subtract carving wax by scraping the excess carving wax off, and bringing it down to the surface. The next step would be to sand the surface smooth. This action is repeated until the surface is finished as best as you can make it.






The alcohol lamp is shown burning. An alcohol flame is almost invisible. A studio-made metal wax working tool is shown, as well as an old paring knife. A wax pen may be used for the same purpose. The wax pen is a useful tool for welding carving wax, such as adding cast carving wax balls to limbs.






Carving wax may be carved, sawn, scraped, cut, drilled, and added to, using a wax pen.






This old photo shows a clean hole drilled into the neck of an upper torso, using a drill bit. The hole allows for test stringing with round elastic doll cord. Carving wax is tough enough to withstand tensioning. This is one reason why the oil-clay doll parts were cast into carving wax.






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