Thursday, November 22, 2012

08 Joint Design Nº 15




There are several ways to joint the torso. In the diagram below, the torso is one piece, with the neck attached. There are sockets for arms and legs.  The green line represents the socket. This is the type of torso design featured in Ryo Yoshida's book, Yoshida Style Ball Jointed Doll Guide (2006). Click on any image to enlarge it.






A popular torso design is to divide the torso under the breasts. The hips and midsection are one piece, with the top of the midsection made into a ball. The upper torso is one piece with the socket at the bottom. The green line represents the socket.






Similar to the design above, this torso is divided at the bottom of the ribcage. This is a more realistic and natural division because the ribcage can be considered to be a solid form that cannot be bent. This is the design that I will use for my doll. The green line represents the socket.






In this design, the upper torso and midsection are one piece. The hips are another piece, with the socket at the top of the hips. The green line represents the socket.






This three piece torso design has a good range of motion. The midsection has a ball at both the top and the bottom. The top ball fits in the socket at the bottom of the upper torso. The bottom ball fits in the socket of the hips. This design is used as an example for making a porcelain BJD in Martha Armstrong-Hand's book, Learning To Be A Doll Artist (1999). The green line represents the socket.






This is a one piece torso that has no sockets. At the shoulders and hips there are balls. The shoulder balls fit the upper arms. The hip balls fit the upper legs. This torso may also be divided in the same ways as described above. The socket shown here is in the head, and it fits the ball at the top of the neck. The green line represents the socket.



It is easy to see that there are many choices that can be made when designing the torso. Many different combinations may be made. One thing to keep in mind when designing the torso is where the spare is going to be located, for pouring slip into the mold.

Happy Thanksgiving to those of you who observe it.




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