Tuesday, January 31, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 22




Well, it seems that every time I post a photo of a drawing, I see another glaring thing I need to work on. This is the drawing from yesterday, with some more work done on the arm and hand of the side view, as well as some work on the lower leg and ankle areas. I am getting closer and closer to starting my preliminary 44.45cm drawing. After that, the full-size 70cm working drawing. Once the working drawing is completed, then I will use it to make the wire armature for modeling in oil-clay. The wire armature will be supported by a modeling stand.






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Monday, January 30, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 21




I managed to find some time to sit down at my lightbox and trace the front view onto a new sheet, moving it over to make room for the side view, which I have lightly sketched in.



One thing I am going to try to remember to do is to make the head the proper shape this time. The last head I made was backwards when viewed from the top, with the narrow part in the back, and the wide part in the front. Viewed from the top, the skull is somewhat egg shaped, with the wide part in the back and the narrow part in the front. When I start modeling in clay, I'm going to make a checklist of all the details I need to be attentive to.




This is a page from the Figure Drawing book I got, showing what size different bones are in relation to the skull. I think it is quite interesting, and it even seems somewhat helpful. I had to modify the photo because the camera flash washed out some of the detail. Hopefully it is readable now.






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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Saturday, January 28, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 19




Today was a day of sleeping in late. In the afternoon I pruned three apple trees. I also cut down a cherry tree that was too near the fence. The base of this cherry tree was about five or six inches in diameter, so I hope it can be used for making some doll furniture. I will have to cut it up, and put it away to dry nicely. I formerly said it was a pear tree, but was corrected on that. I guess it was just wishful thinking.




Today I created a blank grid to use in Kolourpaint for sketching out some faces. This is the blank grid. I really like the way I can lasso things, and flip them around, to make things symmetrical, and so forth.






I followed a step-by-step method of drawing a face in profile, from Jack Hamm's book, Drawing the Head & Figure. It is a very mechanical method, but I enjoyed trying to do it in Kolourpaint, on the grid I made. I like to use the circle tool, the line tool, the pencil, and the brush, as well as the lasso tools.






This is the start of a front view of a face, from Jack Hamm's book. I've run out of time, so I'll continue it another time.






I would like to add that I found this figure drawing textbook at the local used-book emporium today.



Figure Drawing: The Structure, Anatomy, and Expressive Design of Human Form. 4th edition.
Nathan Goldstein.
NY: Prentice Hall, 1993.
ISBN: 0133192865

This book is totally different than Jack Hamm's book Drawing the Head & Figure. This seems to be a textbook for a college-level, life-drawing class. Instead of giving formulaic hints for drawing the figure, this book explains the principles of the structure, anatomy, and design of the figure. I think both books are useful. When first learning how to draw the figure, it is nice to have a tool chest of drawing rules-of-thumb to use, such as Hamm's book. I think this book goes more into depth about why the rules-of-thumb became rules. It is filled with drawings, diagrams, photos, and academic text descriptions. I got it because I am always looking for a Philosopher's Stone to help me integrate artistic anatomy with practical art work.




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Friday, January 27, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 18




I got some more done on the first drawing. Now everything is in the drawing. This is the first version. I am planning on modifying it before I size it up to the 44.45cm preliminary drawing, which will then be sized up to the 70cm drawing.






The Vitruvian Man is a world-renowned drawing created by Leonardo da Vinci circa 1487. This is a modified drawing of The Vitruvian Woman by way of Jack Hamm's book, Drawing the Head & Figure, (1963). It shows movement and proportion of the female figure.



References:
Vitruvian Man
Drawing the Head & Figure. Jack Hamm. NY: Grosset & Dunlap, 1963. ISBN: 044839540





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Thursday, January 26, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 17




This is a drawing of the head and torso, on 8.5x11 inch graph paper. I hope to get some more done on it tomorrow. Starting to work on a project is always the hardest thing for me to do. Usually, once I start, it all falls into place.






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Wednesday, January 25, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 16






On the left is the graph paper, taped together, ready for the preliminary working drawing. I have laid out seven head lengths of 10 fourths inches each. From top to bottom it measures 44.5 centimeters (17.5 inches). I guess it could be used for a full size drawing for a 40cm doll (9.1% shrinkage included)? My full-size working drawing is going to be 10 centimeters per head length, so the ratio will be 6.35mm to 10mm, or 1/4 inch to one centimeter. I have tried to make it as easy as possible. The bottom line is that I am ready to start my preliminary working drawing. I am totally saturated with research and references.






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Tuesday, January 24, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 15




I found this very nice reference diagram of the female with a skeleton inside. I think this is going to be very useful. This diagram is also very close to seven head lengths tall for the proportion.



The figure in this diagram has quite a bit of subcutaneous adipose tissue, so it is quite obvious that the diagram was drawn a long time before the current skinny trend was in vogue.




This was the second preliminary working drawing. I see now that I tried to get it all on one sheet of graph paper. I used 6 fourths inches for a head length.



I think I will also make a third preliminary working drawing this time around, but instead of using 6 fourths inches, I will use 10 fourths inches. The reason for that is because I am making a head length on the full size working drawing 10 centimeters. So one fourth of an inch on the preliminary working drawing will be 1 centimeter on the full size working drawing. I will tape two sheets of graph paper together to make the larger drawing.

One other thing I've decided to do is that I'm not going to indicate the ball joints on my first working drawing. Instead, I'm going to try and make a nice drawing of the full realistic figure. I found that the indications of ball joints on my working drawing were more confusing to me than helpful. I can always overlay the indications of ball joints, later.




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Monday, January 23, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 14




Yesterday I overlaid head lengths on a 7-heads proportioned outline of a female body, and today I looked for an example of a female skull. The main differences between a female and a male skull are the chin and the brow. Both of these are usually much larger on the male. The female has less of a brow, and more of a pointy chin. I think I may have found a good example of a female skull in the following engraving of a skull.

Image Source


I also found these very interesting class notes about the head and skull proportions. You must click on the links to see the Figures. The examples of the proportions seem to be very good. There are even some short video clips.




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Sunday, January 22, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 13




I took the graphic image I made yesterday and placed some head lengths in red over the views of the body, to get a better idea of overall proportions. This was all done from what I remember of general rule-of-thumb proportions. I will compare this with what the books say, to see how I did. I'm still playing. It seems like I am taking a long time in this design stage of making the third version of my first 60cm BJD; but what I learned making the first two versions is that it is better to spend some time designing the doll, rather than jumping into it so quickly.



These computer graphic images are easy, fast, easily changed, and very inexpensive to do. Also, I am having a lot of fun doing them. This is my hobby, so having fun is a big part of it.




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Saturday, January 21, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 12




I have been playing around with some filters in a graphics program called the GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program). Below is a heavily modified image, using brightness/contrast, and a Cartooning filter. In this image I have erased all the interior details. I hope that this type of image will be helpful when I start drawing my full-size working drawings.






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Friday, January 20, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 11




I've been playing around with some photos from Akira Gomi's World Beauty Project, moving and resizing parts to make them fit a seven head proportion canon. For example, I can lasso one half of a face, copy it, paste it, flip it, then move it into place. In this example, I have lassoed the right half of the face without hair over the shoulder, and copy/paste/flip/moved it over the left half of the face. I am using right and left as I am looking at the image, not the model's right and left. I do similar modifications with the arms, legs, and body. These types of modifications are easy and quick to do with Kolourpaint, a simple graphics paint program.



I will be using the modified photo references when I do my working drawings.




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Thursday, January 19, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 10






In the above image, A and C are modified images from Peck's anatomy book. The boy in the middle is from a growth chart in Loomis' Figure Drawing book. This is the same growth chart that Ryo Yoshida is using as a reference for doing the drawing in his book. A and C have been modified using Kolourpaint. The only thing I did to the boy was clean up some diagonal dashed lines that went across the drawing. C is modified from the 6.5 head length girl in the growth chart in Peck's book. I feel like I am getting very close to start my own drawing. It is a lot of fun to play in Kolourpaint.

References:

Learning To Be A Doll Artist.
Martha Armstrong-Hand.
Livonia, WI: Scott Publ., 1999.
ISBN 1893625044

Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist.
Stephen Rogers Peck.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1979.
ISBN 0195030958

Figure Drawing For All It's Worth.

Andrew Loomis.
New York: The Viking Press, 1943.




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Wednesday, January 18, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 9






In the above image, A, the drawing on the left, is from a growth chart in LTBADA. The drawing on the right, B, is from Peck's anatomy book. I have re-sized and moved things around in both drawings, using Kolourpaint. From the bottom of the feet, up to the knees is about two head lengths. From the top of the head to the bottom of the breasts is about two head lengths. The mid-point is a little above the crotch. The wrists should be at about the same level as the crotch, and the tips of the fingers should reach about mid-thigh. A hand length, from the wrist to the tips of the fingers is about three-fourths of one head length. The foot is about as long as one head length. These are all just rules of thumb, of course.

References:

Learning To Be A Doll Artist.
Martha Armstrong-Hand.
Livonia, WI: Scott Publ., 1999.
ISBN 1893625044

Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist.
Stephen Rogers Peck.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1979.
ISBN 0195030958




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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 8




Today I played around with overall, full-figure proportions, using an image from the growth chart on page 218 in Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist by Stephen Rogers Peck. I used Kolourpaint to re-size, and move things around. The original image shows a figure that is nearly 7 head lengths tall. I adjusted the overall proportions to 7 head lengths tall. The arms are still too short, in my opinion. Peck shows the wrist at the mid-point. As a general rule-of-thumb, the wrist should come down to the crotch, and the fingers should reach almost mid-thigh. Other than that, I think this looks better. I am getting closer to the point where I will start drawing my full-size working drawings.



Most of the figure drawing rules-of-thumb are based on the underlying skeletal structure. The above figure is too slender for me to use as a model for a working drawing. I want my girl to have a fuller figure, with more subcutaneous adipose tissue (fat).

Reference:
Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist.
Stephen Rogers Peck.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1979.
ISBN 0195030958


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Monday, January 16, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 7




This shows the eyes of a female, looking straight ahead. What I tried to do was figure out how much of an eye is showing. I have a set of 26mm round acrylic doll eyes. The diameter of the eyeball is 26mm. The diameter of the iris is 14mm. So I used the same ratio for the photo of the eyes, and tried to draw where the eyeball would be. I also copy/pasted eyes on the face to see if the five eyes wide rule-of-thumb worked with this photo. It came close.



The head for my second doll was 9cm in head length. This new doll is going to be 10cm in head length. I may have to use 18mm eyes in the new head, instead of 16mm eyes, when modeling the doll. After she is cast, 16mm eyes may fit perfectly? This is the kind of stuff I am thinking about now, when designing my doll.


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Sunday, January 15, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 6




Today I was out of the studio all day. We went to the big Rembrandt exhibit at The NC Museum of Art in Raleigh. I have never seen so many of The Master's paintings together like this before. It was awesome.

The realistic human face is usually drawn about five eyes wide, as shown in this example.



More and more, computers, with access to massive data bases are defining beauty, mathematically. This is an interesting web site that has developed a mask that can be overlaid on top of photos of human faces to see if the face is beautiful. It is called the Marquardt Beauty Mask.



This page shows how to apply the mask, to your own photo, or another photo. While I do not know how useful this is to make a head for a BJD, I am including it because it is interesting and fun. I am so easily distracted.

Mask on Marilyn Monroe. Image Source


This is what the five-eyes rule-of-thumb looks like on the Marquardt Mask.



It looks to me like the mathematical ideal of beauty has the eyes spaced a little further apart? Oh well, I am just mentioning this because I think it is fun, and I like to have fun when making my doll. After all, not all dolls are realistic. Some are based on Manga or Anime, and some of those have extra large Moe eyes. However, I am going to try and make a realistic human looking face. That is probably one of the most challenging things to do.

A ball jointed doll is a multimedia figurative sculpture.


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Saturday, January 14, 2012

02 Drawing Nº 5




Today I was researching face shapes. One of the most amazing faces research sites on the whole Internet is at FaceResearch.org. They have a demo page where you can see the average between faces.




This is what the demo page looks like when it is first opened.



These are screenshots of the first face in the upper left hand corner, and each of the faces on the bottom row look like. There are a total of 206 faces on this page (scroll down), so just combining two faces will give you over 21,000 average faces. The thing is, you can combine more than two faces. Look how many face shapes there are. I will be exploring more faces shapes, and face proportions during this drawing phase of making the third doll. They say that the eyes are the soul of the doll, but I think it is a little more than the eyes, it is the total face shape, proportions, and eyes that are the soul of the doll. Click on any image to enlarge it.






















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