Saturday, March 31, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 9




I decided to define where the knees are located. I use my calipers to take a measurement from the working drawing, and marked the location on the clay figure. Then I add the coils for the knees. Click any image to enlarge it.






I also decided to establish where the bum is located, more or less, so I also added some coils to the backside of the figure. Once again, I used my calipers to measure the working drawing to get an idea where the bum starts. This is a side view.






This is a back view of the clay coils added to the bum of the figure.






This is the other side view of the clay coils on the bum.






Next I put some clay coils on the tummy to build it out some more.






Then I added some more coils to the bum. I am working all around the figure, adding clay coils. I turn the figure frequently. It is also a good idea to step back and take a look at the figure from a distance, from time to time.






This is a front view of the raked tummy coils.






This is a back view of the raked coils on the bum. I rake the coils to blend them together.






Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Friday, March 30, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 8




I start out by turning on the light over my oil-clay, to warm it up for modeling. The box is on the floor, right next to the sculpture stand. Click on an image to enlarge it.






The warm oil-clay being rolled out into a coil. I fold each coil of oil-clay in half, and cut it at the fold in order to make two identical coils. I apply each coil to a side of the figure, building up a foundation of clay that I will model the figure on top of. I stand up while I am modeling the figure. This way, I can reach all parts of the figure, reach into my box for more clay, roll out coils, and turn the figure easily in order to apply the coils evenly around the armature.






Here I have applied coils to the upper torso. I have rotated the arms out of my way for now.






Once the coils have been pressed into place, I use the rake tool to blend the coils together. This is the front view.






This is a side view.






This is the back view.






This is the other side view. As more of the foundation is built-up on the armature, she is starting to look more like a figure.



There is still much more work to do.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 7




I am applying coils of oil-clay to the upper legs. I roll out a coil of clay, fold it in half, cut it, then press the identical coils, one to each leg. Each coil is pressed firmly in place.






Once the upper legs have been covered with coils, I use the rake tool to blend the coils.



This is the foundation of clay that I will be modeling over.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 6




Since the whole armature is supported at the pelvis, that is where I am going to start modeling. After establishing the pelvis, I will work up and down from there. The first thing I do is add coils of clay to the armature.

Since my oil-clay is brand new, I knead it in my fingers until it is soft and doesn't crack when I squeeze it. Then I roll it out into a long coil. I try to make the coil as even as I can. Then I fold the coil in half and cut it with my paring knife. I have two identical pieces of clay that are the same size.

I apply these coils to the armature, one piece to each side. I place each coil, then press it firmly onto the armature. I keep doing this until I have covered the pelvic area of the torso. Click on the image to enlarge it.






This is a front view of the coils added to the pelvic area.






This is a side view.






This is the back view. You can see where the back iron enters the pelvis.






This is the other side view.






I use one of the tools I made from paint brush handles as a rake. I use the rake to blend the coils to each other. A rake can also be purchased from a sculpture supply house, but I prefer to make my own little tools. I sanded the end of the paint brush handle to a sharp edge, then used the edge of a half-round file to make the notches.






This is an in-progress snapshot of the coils being blended together with the rake.






This is the front view, after using the rake to blend the oil-clay coils together.






This is a side view.






This is the back view.



At the beginning, this is what I will be doing, until the entire armature is covered with coils of oil-clay and the coils are blended together with the rake. At that point I will inscribe the center lines and other reference lines in the oil-clay to prepare for more modeling on top of the foundation that I have made.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 5




This is a list of books that may be helpful when modeling the figure? Some of these books may be out-of-print and/or unavailable. Some of them may be available through your local Public Library, or through the Inter-Library Loan system. I use World Cat when searching for books in libraries. I also use Used.AddAll.Com when searching for used, rare, or out-of-print books online. Used.AddAll.Com checks quite a few online book mongers and displays the results ordered by Price Ascending by default.




This book is out-of-print and unavailable. However, it is Martha's Method that I am currently following to make my BJD. Use World Cat to find an available copy in a library, and order it through your Public Library's Inter-Library Loan system.



Learning to be a Doll Artist: an apprenticeship with Martha Armstrong-Hand.
Martha Armstrong-Hand.
Livonia, MI: Scott Publications, 1999.
ISBN: 1893625044




Ryo Yoshida has one of the best step-by-step tutorials about making a One-Of-A-Kind BJD. This is a Japanese language book, but it is filled with detailed photos about how to do everything. I got my copy through the Amazon Marketplace.



Yoshida Style Ball Jointed Doll Making Guide.
Ryo Yoshida.
Hobby Japan, 2006.
ISBN: 978-4894254602




This is a sculpture studio guide for making figure sculpture, from modeling the figure in clay, all the way to casting it in bronze using the lost wax technique. Tuck Langland is an elected member of the National Sculpture Society. I like this book so much that I own two copies of it.



From Clay To Bronze: A Studio Guide to Figurative Sculpture.
Tuck Langland.
NY: Watson-Guptill, 1999.
ISBN: 978-0823006380




This is a guide to making figurative sculpture using traditional materials and methods.



The Sculptor's Way: a Guide to Modeling and Sculpture.
Brenda Putnam.
Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2003.
(Originally published by Watson-Guptill Publications in 1948.)
ISBN: 0486423131




I really like this book about modeling portraits in clay. It has a lot of practical information that I find very helpful.



Modeling A Likeness In Clay: Step-By-Step Techniques For Capturing Character.
Daisy Grubbs.
NY: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1982.
ISBN: 0823030946




There are not very many books that show how to model the figure in clay, step-by-step. This is not an anatomy book, but a hands-on book about modeling a figure in clay. Peter Rubino covers modeling a female torso, a female reclining figure, and also goes into some details about modeling arms, hands, and feet. Sculpting The Female Torso is a YouTube video about this book.



Sculpting The Figure in Clay.
Peter Rubino.
NY: Watson-Guptill, 2010.
ISBN: 978-0823099245




This is a French language book about modeling the figure in clay. Lots of photos and good tutorials covering the modeling of a sitting female figure, as well as details such as hands and feet.



Modelage du corps humain: La silhouette.
Philippe Chazot.
Paris: UlissEditions, 2009.
ISBN: 978-2844151209




This is a book about modeling heads and faces in clay. It compliments the above book. This is the English language version of the book.



Modelling Heads and Faces in Clay.
Berit Hildre.
London: A & C Black, 2008.
80 pages. Illustrated in color.
ISBN: 978-1408102671




This little book has only 38 pages, but those 38 pages are packed with some very good information about modeling the figure in clay. It was originally published in 1951, but there are still copies available. I have a 1965 reprint of this book. It is a real treasure.



Modelling a Figure in Clay.
Albert Pountney.
London: Alec Tiranti, 1951 (reprint 1965).
ISBN: N/A




This is probably one of the best books about modeling the human figure. It has been reprinted by Dover, so there is no reason not to have a copy of this book on your studio reference shelf. I have had my copy for many years now.



Modelling and Sculpting the Human Figure.
Edouard Lanteri.
NY: Dover, 1985.
ISBN: 978-0486250069




This is an amazing book that documents the making of a sculpture by Richard McDermott Miller. There is a cast of this bronze sculpture at Brookgreen Gardens in South Carolina, and it is beautiful. There is quite a bit of information about modeling the figure in clay in this book. I actually bought my copy of this book at Brookgreen Gardens. If you are interested in figurative sculpture, and get a chance to go, you should make it a point to visit Brookgreen Gardens. It has the largest collection of American Figurative Sculpture in the whole world.



Voices in Bronze: the creation of a sculpture by Richard McDermott Miller.
Philip Palmedo and Eiza Hicks.
Danbury, CT: Rutledge Books, 1998.
ISBN: 1582440344




This is a very exhaustive anatomy book for artists. It is an especially good reference for sculptors.



Human Anatomy for Artists: The Elements of Form.
Eliot Goldfinger.
Oxford University Press, 1991.
ISBN: 978-0195052060




This book is all about using a formulaic method for modeling a figure in polymer clay. Learn the formula, then do your own thing.



Creating Lifelike Figures in Polymer Clay.
Katherine Dewey.
NY: Watson-Guptill Publications, 2000.
ISBN: 0823015033




This is another book about modeling character figures in polymer clay. I think it is a lot of fun. If you have never modeled in clay before, this book will get you up and going in no time. Once you've learned the basics, you can apply them to more advanced or realistic sculptures.



How to Make Clay Characters.
Maureen Carlson.
North Light Books, 1997.
ISBN: 978-0891347217




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, March 26, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 4




I have applied the first two pound block of oil-clay to the armature. This is the front view.






This is the side view.






Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 3




This is the beginning of adding modeling clay to the armature. I have covered up the wires.






I can raise the arms to get them out of the way when I am modeling the torso. Alternatively, I can also take them off the torso if I want to or need to.



The warm oil-clay is easy to work with. I keep the box with the incandescent light bulb close to my sculpture stand. My sculpture stand rotates easily, so I can turn the armature often. It is a good idea to work from several points of view when modeling.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.