Monday, April 30, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 39


I worked some more on the 8cm oil-clay practice foot.

I used some studio-made wooden modeling tools to tinker with the toes.

The tool on the top is made from a bamboo skewer. The tool on the bottom is made from a wooden dowel.

The pencil point on one end, and the spatula shape on the other end are a very useful combination, and are very easy to make.

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Sunday, April 29, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 38


The foot tutorial in Sculpting The Figure In Clay, by Peter Rubino, shows the toes of the foot being modeled like steps. I also have a book called Dynamic Figure Drawing by Burne Hogarth which shows the figure in block form. I looked up his tips for drawing feet and found the toes of the foot blocked in like steps. None of the photo references of real feet that I have, show toes like that. Finally I found some toes that look a little bit like steps, on the left foot of the Statue of Liberty.


Some foot drawings in Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist, by Stephen Rogers Peck also has some stepped toe references.



I think these types of toes look very nice, so I may try to make them for my figure. These types of stepped toes seem to be more of a sculptural convention than any toes that most real people have?


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Saturday, April 28, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 37




I added some oil-clay coils to the upper arm, pressed the coils firmly in place, then blended the coils with a wooden rake tool.






As I built-up the upper arms, the pieces of clay I used got smaller. I took the arms off the torso and worked with each of them in my hands.



I also did some more foot research. I feel like I'm almost ready to start modeling the feet.




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Friday, April 27, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 36




For practice, I made a small 8cm long clay sketch of a foot, using some Roma Plastilina. I have been studying all of my artistic anatomy books, as well as some drawing and sculpture books. Each book seems to contribute something new or useful. Click on any image to enlarge it.



The foot is wider at the toes and narrower at the heel. The outer side of the foot contacts the ground from heel to toe. There are three major masses of the foot; the heel, the arch, and the front and middle soles created by the toes and the padding behind them. The heel and the sole provide a pedestal base for the column of the figure. There are four generalized masses of the sole of the foot; the heel, the padded outer ridge, the large cushion behind the four toes, and the large pad behind the big toe. The foot is an incredible structure made of 26 bones, 33 joints, 107 ligaments, 31 tendons, and tons of blood vessels and nerves. All together, the feet hold 25% of all the bones in the body.










I tried to block in the form of the foot as best as I could.






References:

Gray290.png from Wikipedia
Gray291.png from Wikipedia
Page 56 from Figure Drawing by Andrew Loomis




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Thursday, April 26, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 35




I have been thinking about making some oil-clay sketches of feet. I am gathering some reference materials to study while I am making the oil-clay sketches. This is what the feet on my figure look like right now. They really do not have very many planes, as a foundation to build on. Click on any image to enlarge it.






The human figure is all interconnected, and the full weight of a standing human being is on the feet.






Generally speaking, the female bone structure is smaller than the male's, overall. Notice that the width of the feet together, is about one head length. So each foot, at the widest point, is about one half head length.






The bones of the foot create arches.






The inside ankle bone is higher than the outside ankle bone. The inside ankle bone is also known as the tibia, or shin bone.






I have a wax life cast of the foot of a young woman that I made many years ago, in an alginate mold. I use if for reference.






In this modified photo of the top view of the wax reference foot, the red arrow is pointing to the outside ankle bone. The green line is where the inside ankle bone is. The pink line shows how there is an angle between the inside and outside ankle bones; they are not directly across from each other. The white line is the leg section, right above the ankle bones. The cyan line is the highest part of the foot, with different planes slanting away on each side of it.







This is a montage of a rotation of the wax foot. It is easier to see some of the different planes of the foot when it is rotated.






This is the rotation with the camera at a slightly different angle.



Reference:

a handbook of anatomy for the art student. Fourth Edition. Arthur Thomson. 1915.




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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 34




I was getting low on Prima Plastilina oil-clay, and today my order from Dick Blick arrived. I only had one pound of oil-clay left, so this arrived just in time.






I cut the four pounds of oil-clay up and put it in the clay-warming box. Now I have five pounds of oil-clay to work with.



When I started this project, I had four pounds of Prima Plastilina. I ordered eight more pounds, thinking that twelve pounds of oil-clay would be enough for this 70cm figure, especially since I was using the wood pieces in the armature. Now I have four pounds more, for a total of sixteen pounds of oil-clay. I sure hope this is enough to finish her.




I added some coils of oil-clay to the lower arms.






I blended the coils I added above, then added some more coils and blended them together. I also twisted the hands a little bit, so they are not quite as much in a medical anatomy position. Just adding some more clay to the arms is starting to make them look better.



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Tuesday, April 24, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 33




My working drawing shows the neck angled forwards slightly.






So I cut into the front of the neck on the figure, down to the collarbone. I also removed some clay from between the collarbone and the muscle behind it. Peter Rubino, in his book, Sculpting The Figure In Clay says that this low area on either side of the neck is a transitional area between the two high forms of the clavicle and trapezius muscle.






I used the wooden rake tool to blend in the cuts I made.



Later in the modeling process, I will add coils for neck muscles that go from the pit of the neck up towards the ears.




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Monday, April 23, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 32




I added some oil-clay coils to the upper arms. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I blended the coils together with the wooden rake tool.



Every time I add clay to the figure, I get closer and closer to the final form. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll everyday. I am figuring it out as I go along.




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Sunday, April 22, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 31




I mentioned Arthur Thomson's book, a handbook of anatomy for art students the other day, of which I have a Dover reprint of the Fifth Edition. The 1915 Fourth Edition of this anatomy book is available online, to either download as a PDF, or to read online. These illustrations of the pelvis are from the 1915 Fourth Edition, which is in the Public Domain. These diagrams show the difference between the pelvic bones of a male and a female. Click on any image to enlarge it.






Here, I am showing the same diagrams in a higher contrast, so the differences can be seen better.







This is a side view of my figure, with the female pelvic bone superimposed over the top of it. I'm trying to get an idea of how the pelvic bone influences the surface anatomy.






This is a front view, with the female pelvic diagram superimposed over the photo of the figure.



I will have to play around with this some more.




This diagram, from page 263, is a comparison of the female and male pelvis with an outline of the form around it.






References:

PDF copy of the 1915 Fourth Edition of a handbook of anatomy for art students by Arthur Thomson (1858-1935), at The Internet Archive.

Read online copy of the 1915 Fourth Edition of a handbook of anatomy for art students by Arthur Thomson (1858-1935), at The Internet Archive.




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Saturday, April 21, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 30




I added some oil-clay to the front top of the legs. In this case, I held a coil of clay in my left hand, and pinched off pieces of clay to add to the figure. With practice, it is fairly easy to pinch off small pieces of clay that are the same size. I did it this way because I feel that I am getting close to where I want to be in this area of the figure. When I am adding large amounts of clay, to build-up an area quickly, I like to use coils of oil-clay. I have removed the arms so they don't get in my way.






I used a wooden rake tool to blend the added clay together.






I really enjoy seeing people's studios or work spaces. This is a snapshot of my basement studio. During the day, this is the brightest corner in the whole basement. All the windows in the basement are covered with plastic because the basement windows are not very tight. I prefer to work in a space without too many drafts. I try to keep my studio floor swept clean so that when I drop clay on the floor, I can pick it up without it being covered with dust, lint, sawdust, and whatever else can be on the floor of a studio.



On the left is a sculpture modeling stand with a one half inch thick piece of glass on top. The arms of the figure are there in this shot. I usually roll out coils of oil-clay on the glass. To the right of that modeling stand is my cardboard box with an incandescent light on top, warming my oil-clay. Above the box is another fixture, clamped to a piece of wood that is screwed into the window frame. Another modeling stand is to the right of that, with the figure I am working on, on a modeling stand. To the right of that is my easel, with the working drawing on it.

Both of my modeling stands are made from ancient stands that were once parts of floor fans. Both of them are adjustable in height, and both of the wooden boards on top, rotate. They do not have wheels, so they stay in place, and are very sturdy. My easel was made from scrap 1x4 inch lumber. It can pivot to different angles, and the rest for the canvas frame can be raised or lowered. Most of the tools and equipment in my studio has been hand made or adapted from found objects.

Behind the easel, on the other side of a bookcase, is my little 2D animation studio. I made a rotating pegged animation disc that fits in an old drafting table. Next to the animation desk is an old computer with a used flat bed scanner attached to it. I hand draw little animations, ink them by hand, then scan the drawings into the computer. I finish the animations in the computer.

I have a whole basement for my studio. All the above studio stuff is in one of four rooms in the basement. The other three rooms have my other studios in them, including jewelry and metal casting, woodworking, and my library/computer room. All my messes stay down in the basement.




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Friday, April 20, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 29




I am adding some coils of clay to the back of the upper legs. I try my best to apply the clay as evenly as I can to both legs.






I always blend the coils of oil-clay together with a wooden rake tool after I have applied the coils to the figure.






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