Saturday, June 30, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 99




After looking at the top and bottom views of the eyes, I try and get the inner eyes on the same level, so to speak. That is, one eye is not higher from the face plane than the other eye, using the first eye completed, as the standard. This is a difficult thing for me to do. I press clay in, then turn the piece around in all directions to see if I can discern if the planes are equal. I sure hope that makes sense? At this stage, most of what I do cannot really be described in words. Looking at this photo, I see that I am getting closer, but there are details that do not match. So what I want to do is to go over all the labels that I have made, and see if the labels match. How well do they match? Match each label. It is almost like a children's matching game. I guess the key word here is: play. I try not to take myself too seriously. Work is serious. Play is less serious. Reach inside and try to touch the inner child. I guess that is the best explanation I can make for now. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, June 29, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 98




It is important to  look at the practice oil-clay features from all angles, not just the front view. The photographs do not look anything at all like what I see, when I am holding the practice piece in my hands. When it is in my hands, I can rotate it and see how the light plays over the modeling. The photograph flattens all the modeling. This is a view from the bottom. Click on any image to enlarge it.






This is a view from the top.






In this montage, I have marked some of the edges in red, so they can be compared a little easier. It looks like the right eye (of the practice piece) is still too flat. I need to make it curve some more. The eye ball is spherical.






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Thursday, June 28, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 97




I started to work on opening the closed eye. I used one of my studio-made wooden tools. Click on any image to enlarge it.






So far, I like making a socket and placing a sphere in it, then modeling over the sphere and socket to make the eye, better than modeling a closed eye, then opening it to make an eye. However, I am going to continue to work on this eye some more.






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Wednesday, June 27, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 96




I did not document this change when I was modeling because I did not remember to take any photographs, but I cut out the eye socket and raised it about one centimeter or so, then filled in the cuts. In this comparison photo, it is quite obvious that the eye socket has been raised. I learned about cutting and moving clay from watching Philippe Faraut videos. Click on any image to enlarge it.







One thing I noticed is that I did not make the upper eye lid go all the way over  to the tear duct. I added a small coil of clay to fix that.






This is a side view of the eye.






This is a three-quarter view of the eye.






I have outlined some areas in red. In the left photo I can see that I may need to make the upper eye lid more curved. They seem to have about the same amount of curve, but an upper eye lid should be slightly more curved than a lower eye lid. In the middle photo, I can see that the upper eye lid sticks out further than the lower eye lid. That is how it should be, but I am not so certain that it really needs to stick out that much further? It looks okay to me, right now. In the right three quarter view photo the cheek and the eye meet and form a slight indent. I believe that is caused by the differences in angles of the bones around the eye and above the jaw bone.






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Tuesday, June 26, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 95




These are my first oil-clay practice eyes, one open, and one closed. I did not look at any references when modeling these eyes. I tried to remember all the details of the eyes, and modeled from memory. Click on any image to enlarge it.






A sphere covered with two slabs is how Philippe Faraut shows the basic structure of the eye. I found this helpful when I saw it. It helps to remember that the eyes are not flat, but round. The eye lids cover a sphere.






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Monday, June 25, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 94




I started a practice oil-clay eye. Click any image to enlarge it.



Berit Hildre starts with a closed eye, then opens the eyelid to make an eye. Philippe Faraut makes an eye socket, then puts clay in the eye socket to model the eye. He adds the eyelids to the eyeball. I may try one method on one side, and the other method on the other side, to see which one I like better.

So far, when modeling the eyes, I have had a difficult time getting them placed correctly, which is why I have decided to make some pratice eyes.




Naming the parts of the eye helps to understand it better.






Muscles of the eye (in red).






Bones around the eye (in red).



Reference:
Modelling: a guide for teachers and students.
Edouard Lanteri.
London: Chapman & Hall, ltd., 1902-11.





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Sunday, June 24, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 93




I am starting to investigate the eyes in a little more detail. I am going to try and spend some time on the eyes because the eyes in a ball-jointed doll can be changed. Being able to modify the doll in this way is one of the things I like about contemporary BJDs. One book that is available to everyone is Edouard Lanteri's 1902 edition of Modelling. A copy can be found at Google Books or The Internet Archive. It is in the Public Domain. A Dover reprint can also be found or ordered from your favorite book monger. Click on any image to enlarge it.





















































Reference:

Modelling: a guide for teachers and students.
Edouard Lanteri.
London: Chapman & Hall, ltd., 1902-11.




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Saturday, June 23, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 92




I worked over the surface of the practice oil-clay mouth I modeled yesterday. I did not have much time to do much of anything artsy today, so I am glad to have these practice facial features to play with. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day. Practice, practice, and more practice. I used a couple of my studio-made modeling tools. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, June 22, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 91




I followed the mouth exercise in Berit Hildre's book, modeling heads and faces in clay. I tried to document my steps with my camera, but I'm pretty sure I missed a few. Nevertheless, there should be enough information in the photo montage to be able to make several practice mouths, if desired. Click on any image to enlarge it.



01. Start with a piece of clay curved like the jaw.
02. Press a couple of coils of clay onto it for lips.
03. Blend the ends of the coils into the cheeks.
04. Add a coil for the upper lip, and two coils for the lower mouth.
05. Blend those coils.
06. Add a small coil for Cupid's Bow, and a small ball to the mid upper lip.
07. Depress Cupid's Bow with a tool, and blend the small clay ball into the upper lip.
08. This is a side view of the progress made, so far.
09. Add some clay to the lower lip to make it rounder.
10. Use a tool to press in the corners of the mouth.
11. Add some coils for the outside of the mouth.
12. Blend them in.
13. Work on symmetry and finish the mouth.
14. The finished mouth, seen from below.

This practice oil-clay mouth was done very quickly. Berit Hildre recommnds doing this exercise several times, trying to give each mouth a different character.

One very interesting thing I found out is that the mouth muscle is the only muscle not connected to a bone. Instead, it connects to the muscles at the corners of the mouth and ends in the deep layers of the skin and mucus membranes. I will be making a closed mouth for this ball-jointed doll.

To learn more about human facial proportions, see these YouTube videos:

George Davis Proportions
Joanna Mozdzen Facial Proportions


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Thursday, June 21, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 90




I started working on the oil-clay practice nose block form by using a pointed wooden tool to make two nostrils, one on each side of the septum. I used the blunt end of the tool to push out the wings of the nostrils from the inside. Then I defined the septum. After that, I smoothed the edges of the various planes. Finally I checked for symmetry and smoothed out tool marks. Click on the image to enlarge it.



While looking for references to nose muscles, I found this very interesting web site about facial expressions which I think is an interesting art anatomy tool. The site is called ARTNATOMIA. The online version is free to use. There is also an offline version of the program available for download, for a payment. I did not spend too much time playing with it, but I will probably go back again when I have more time to do so.

I have a book by Stephen Rogers Peck, titled Atlas of Facial Expression (NY: Oxford University press, 1987.) which is pretty good, but ARTNATOMIA seems like a much better tool because it is interactive.

SCULPTING EARS is a very detailed step-by-step tutorial of how to go about modeling ears in polymer clay. I have seen this sculptor's work at a doll show, and it is very good. His name is Mark A. Dennis, and he has also written a good looking book, titled The Human Figure in Clay.




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Wednesday, June 20, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 89




I am beginning to work on an oil-clay practice nose, so the first thing I want to do is become familiar with the parts and planes of the nose. I made this little diagram to learn more about the nose. I am going to start with a nose block form that has six definite planes. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I found a couple of reference noses on the Internet using a Google image search.






This is a turnaround of the Roma Plastilina practice nose block form that I am going to start with. I have tried to indicate the curve of the face that the nose rests on, as well as the curve of the upper lip. A nose, not even a practice nose, does not exist all alone, but has a relationship with the rest of the face. Nevertheless, the focus of this practice piece is the nose, so I am not going to pay too much attention to the other parts right now.

I will be using various references, by Berit Hildre, Edouard Lanteri, Philippe Faraut, Daisy Grubbs, Peter Rubino, and the Internet to model this practice nose in oil-clay.






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Tuesday, June 19, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 88




This is a diagram of the ear from Lanteri's 1902 Modelling book, with my own labels. Click on any image to enlarge it.






Most of the ear tutorials I have seen are very similar. Each person's ear is different, yet the same. The individual differences are in the details. My favorite place to look at photographic stock ear references is Deviant Art.



1. Start with a block ear form. The ear is tilted back about 15 degrees.
2. Use a tool to carve a groove to define the Helix.
3. Use a tool to carve out the Outer Auditory Canal.
4. Use a tool to carve out the Ear Notch, defining the Tragus, and Antitragus.
5. The Helix goes into the Outer Auditory Canal. There is a small V indentation at the top of the conch, making it look somewhat like a Y.
6. Smooth and blend all parts, using fingers, tools, brushes, and so forth.




Although I am done with this practice oil-clay ear, I keep noticing more things to do to it. In the turnaround photo below, I have moved the top of the ear away from the background (which would be the head, if this wasn't a practice ear), moved the ear lobe away from the background, and made the Outer Auditory Canal a little bigger. It is all in the details.



I am going to do a practice nose next.




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Monday, June 18, 2012

04 Modeling Nº 87




I worked some more on the oil-clay practice ear I sketched yesterday.







This is the oil-clay practice ear compared to a plaster cast of my daughter's ear when she was eight years old. I always thought she had unusual ears, and that is probably why I molded one in dental alginate, then cast it in plaster.




I am modeling this practice ear in much more detail than the ears on my final doll will be modeled because I will be making a rigid plaster mold of the head, and I will not be able to make as many undercuts on the doll ear as are on the practice ear. If I were making a flexible silicone rubber mold, and casting resin, I might be able to make ears with more detail, and undercuts. The reason I am modeling these practice ears in detail is because I want to learn more about the ears, and this is a good time to do it.




Finally, I would like to point to this neat technique for modeling the second ear on a head, using a mirror. This was mentioned in Berit Hildre's book. The ear in the mirror even faces the same way as the second ear.




A year ago I did a Mouth Modeling Exercise from Berit Hildre's book. I am going to do similar practice exercises for each of the details of the face and head.




This is a final photo of the oil-clay practice ear, after doing a bit more modeling on it, and brushing it with an old toothbrush. It was taken without using the camera's flash.






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