Sunday, June 30, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 232




Note: Blogger continues to act the fool, and post wonky sized images. I do not have anything to do with it, and I do not have time to mess with it.

I cut off the spares and trim the seam lines on the carving wax balls for the elbow. Click on any image to enlarge it.






The elbow balls are supposed to fit inside the arm.






I have a lot of work to do to get the arms jointed properly and to the correct length.






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Saturday, June 29, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 231




Note: I am doing the same thing I always do to make a post, but the images are really wonky in this post. I have no idea why? It is beyond my control.

I carved the spare with my paring knife. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I soak the mold in water. Water and wax do not mix. I can pour molten wax in a water-saturated plaster mold, and the wax will not stick to the mold.






While the mold is soaking in water, I melt some carving wax in my wax pot.






I take the mold out of the water, dab the excess water out with some soft tissue, band it together with rubber bands, and pour the carving wax. 






Here are two cast 24mm carving wax balls for the elbow joint.






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Friday, June 28, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 230




Remember that on July 1st, Google is retiring Google Reader, so be sure to find a replacement before then. I am using Akregator, and have been for awhile now. It is a standalone RSS feed reader. Farewell Google Reader. RIP.

I remove the plaster mold from the coddles. I use a large nail to mark the 24mm plaster ball mold. I use a SurForm to bevel the edges of the mold. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I mark the area to be carved out for the spare. I can carve that out while watching Once Upon A Time on the DVD player tonight. I am thoroughly hooked on it.



Unless I find out that I need another size ball, this is the last plaster ball mold that I need to make in order to finish the joints. It does not seem like too much difference between the elbow ball (24mm) and the wrist ball (22mm) until I remember that the wrist ball is to the outside line of the arm, and the elbow ball is to the inside line of the arm. I will see how these balls work for the joints.




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Thursday, June 27, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 229




I remove the coddles and the clay build-up from the first half of the mold. I cut registration keys and mark where I want the spare to go. I apply parting agent to the plaster mold. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I clean all parting agent residue from the mold, then clamp the coddles in place. I use clay to seal around the edges of the mold.






I mix the plaster to a consistency of 67 (2 parts water to 3 parts plaster by weight). I let the mixture slack so the plaster absorbs all the water. I mix the plaster by hand, squeezing out all the lumps between my fingers. I pour the plaster into the mold box in a steady, even stream. I clean my hands and tools in a bucket of water. Never put plaster (dry, set, or wet) in the drain pipes. I leave the plaster to set for at least an hour.






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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 228




I mixed and poured the first half of the plaster mold for the 24mm diameter ball. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 227




I went into my studio and had to clean up my mess before I could start working on anything. I always seem to procrastinate on the studio cleaning. It is a good idea to start with some sort of clean space to make a new mold. After cleaning a space on the mold table, I placed the coddles around the build-up and sealed the inside with a thin coil of clay. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, June 24, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 226




To make the plaster ball mold for the 24mm elbow ball joint, I am reusing the clay build-up from the 22mm wrist ball joint. I place the 24mm diameter glass marble that I am using as a pattern in the 22mm hole and use my paring knife to trace a line around the marble. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I try my best to keep the knife blade straight up and down while I am tracing the line.






I trim the clay to the scribed line so the 24mm diameter marble will fit into the clay build-up. I cannot easily draw a parting line on the glass marble.






I cut a 24mm diameter hemisphere in a scrap piece of matte board to use as a template to figure out when I have the marble halfway embedded in the clay build-up. When I push the marble into the hole, it sinks the clay build-up a little bit around the edge of the marble. I add a thin coil of clay around the edge of the marble, in order to fill in where it sinks in. It is important to have the edge of the clay build-up perpendicular to parting line of the marble. I use my paring knife to model the clay coil so that the clay build-up is flat.






I push and pull the marble, and scrape and add clay until the template shows me that the marble is embedded halfway into the clay build-up.






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Sunday, June 23, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 225




I cut the spares off the carving wax wrist balls. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I trimmed the mold seam lines on the carving wax wrist balls and began to fit them to the hands and lower arms. Moving right along....






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Saturday, June 22, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 224




I soak the plaster mold in water because water and wax do not mix. It did not take very long for this mold to get saturated with water because it is a freshly made mold. Click on any image to enlarge it.






While the mold is soaking in water, I melt the carving wax in my wax pot. I try to set the wax pot so that the carving wax melts but does not get too hot.






When the carving wax has melted, I take the mold out of the water, dab out the excess water with tissue paper, and band it together with a rubber band. I pour the carving wax into the mold until the mold is full. These are small balls, so I cast them solid. I will drill them and cut them later. Here, the first carving wax ball has been removed from the water-saturated plaster mold, and the second carving wax ball has been cast.



I always try to remember to turn off the wax pot and unplug it from the mains outlet when I am finished casting.




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Friday, June 21, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 223






The plaster mold separated cleanly, and the hard rubber ball was easily removed. I must have got the parting line good. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I carved out the spare with my paring knife. Then I beveled the edges of the mold with a SurForm tool.






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Thursday, June 20, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 222




Remember to always have a bucket with water in it close by when making plaster molds. Never put plaster (dry, wet, or set) down the drain. Click on any image to enlarge it.






It is important to remember to apply a parting agent (50/50 soap/watersolution) to all exposed plaster parts before pouring the second half of the plaster mold. Plaster sticks to plaster, so I must not forget to do this step. I use a soft brush to apply the parting agent.






I put the coddles around the first half of the mold, and put some clay inside to seal it.






I mix and pour the plaster, using a number 67 consistency, which is two parts water to three parts of dry fresh plaster, by weight. I let the plaster slack for a few minutes. Then I carefully stir the mixture by hand, squeezing out all the lumps with my fingers. When it is smooth, I turn on my mold table vibrator and pour the plaster into the coddles in a steady stream until it is full.



It is important to leave the plaster alone for at least an hour to let it set up completely.




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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 221




I removed the clamps from the coddles, then I scribed the ball size in the plaster with the point of a nail. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I removed the coddles and the clay build-up, then I drew where I wanted to put the spare with a pencil. Then I cut the registration keys for the mold.



I did not have enough time to cast the second mold half. I like to have enough time to apply the mold release and mix and pour the plaster, all in the same session. Tomorrow is another day.




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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 220




I worked on the clay build-up some more. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I put coddles around the build-up and clamped them in place.






I sealed the corners of the coddles with the oil-clay coils.






I mixed and poured the plaster for the first half of the mold.






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