Wednesday, July 31, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 263




I worked on the left foot some more today, forming the toes some more. I think this left foot is starting to shape up nicely. The trick for me is to make toes that do not look like little sausages. It is quite a trick, believe me. Those toes do their best to look like little sausages, and I must fight with them to make them look like toes. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 262




I worked some more on the left foot, rounding off some sharp angles, and defining the toes a little bit more. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, July 29, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 261




I removed all the tracing paper and tape. Then I started to smooth the bottom of the feet. I started by rubbing the bottom of the feet on a sanding block. Then I used my wax pen and a scrap piece of carving wax to fill in the low areas, as shown in the photo below. It is a process of filling in, scraping off, and sanding to see where the low spots are, then repeating the process, over and over. Both feet looked like the foot on the left when I started. The foot on the right has been filled in, scraped, and sanded a few times. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, July 28, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 260




I followed the same steps as yesterday to rough carve the left carving wax foot today. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Saturday, July 27, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 259




I continued to layout the feet on some tracing paper. I used a red marker to refine the original tracing. Then I made the final line with a black marker. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I cut out a foot drawing and taped it on the bottom of the foot. Then I used an X-Acto knife to poke through tracing paper, into the carving wax, leaving a dashed line.






I used my paring knife to start carving along the dashed line. Even at this early a stage, the rough-cut foot is starting to look a lot less like a duck's foot.






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Friday, July 26, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 258




I started working on a layout for the feet, but got interrupted, and this is as far as I got. Tomorrow is another day. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, July 25, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 257




I took a look at the feet today. In the image below, I have superimposed a working drawing of feet over a photo of the bottom of the current cast carving wax feet that I have. The image of the feet is from an earlier working drawing. I worked that drawing up from referencing a cast human foot. This drawing may need a little bit of work to get it to work for this doll. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 256




I did a turnaround of the torso in order to study it. The torso was rotated 15 degrees for each photo, for a total of 24 views. The camera's built-in flash was turned ON. There was also lighting from a window and two clamp-lights on the left, and an overhead ceiling light towards the right. Click on the image to enlarge it. (JPEG 1026x1307)






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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 255




I got the right hip socket filled in, and I have decided to keep these sockets for now. It is time to move on and do something else for awhile. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, July 22, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 254




Today I worked on the left hip socket and got it roughly filled-in with carving wax, using my wax pen, and the excess scraped off with the pottery tool. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, July 21, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 253




This photo shows the area of the hip socket I am going to work on. I have a small piece of carving wax that I am going to use to fill in with. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I place the piece of carving wax where I want to fill in.






I use my wax pen to melt the piece of carving wax into the area I want to fill. I also melt the base carving wax that is under the piece of filler, so they both become as one. I use the balled-up cotton sock as a prop, to help hold the lower torso in place while I am working on it, and also to wipe my wax pen off on it.






After adding the filler carving wax, and letting it set up, I use the pottery tool to scrape excess carving wax away.



I still do not know if I am going to keep these sockets, but while I am thinking about it, I am also practicing working with my wax pen.




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Saturday, July 20, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 252




I will use the pottery tool to shape the inside of the hip socket. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I use my wax pen to melt the base carving wax, then I drip, drip, drip carving wax into the molten base wax, building it up, little by little. Then I use the pottery tool to scrape off the excess.



I am hoping to have some more time to work on my doll, now that our out-of-state visitors have returned home. I do enjoy company, but I also treasure my own, alone time as well.




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Friday, July 19, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 251




Martha Armstrong-Hand recommended using a tool shaped like the surface being worked on. Here I am using a pottery tool to try and shape the inside of a hip socket. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, July 18, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 250




This is a work-in-progress photo of my doll. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 248




I don't know what I'm thinking. I'm pretty sure I want to do these sockets over again, yet I find myself working on them with my wax pen. Oh well, if I do not like how they turn out, I can cut them out and redo them. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, July 15, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 247




I went ahead and worked on the other socket, just so I could see what both would look like. Click on any image to enlarge it.






This is what they look like. I really think that I should so these over again.






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Sunday, July 14, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 246






I have been carving away on the left hip socket, and it is almost in position to allow for 40% of the hip joint ball to enter the socket. I don't know. This may not work. If I don't like it, I will do it over again. This is why carving wax is such an awesome design material. It allows me to play, and try different things, without too much bother. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Saturday, July 13, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 245




I used a wooden dowel, inserted through the hole in the top of the lower torso, to knock out the hip sockets. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I have started working on the hip sockets. The hip balls must go into the hip socket at least 40% of their diameter. I may end up pouring some molten carving wax around them, from the top, when I get them into position, in order to hold them in place.






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Friday, July 12, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 244




It is always important to allow enough time to do something. I did not feel like I had enough time yesterday, which is why I turned everything off, and waited until today. First, I put a black masonry tub in the shower stall and filled it with enough water to cover the plaster bat that I am going to use to pour molten carving wax into. The basic principle here is that water and wax do not mix. The plaster bat must be completely saturated with water before I pour molten wax into it. How do I know when it is completely saturated? Air bubbles stop forming on the surface of the plaster. I check it by brushing it with a paint brush. Click on any image to enlarge it.






While the plaster bat is soaking in water, I start to melt the carving wax. I have a mark on the electric hot plate that lets me know where to turn the dial so that the carving wax melts, but does not get too hot.






I always stir the carving wax before I pour it because the talc has a tendency to settle somewhat to the bottom of the wax pot. By stirring it, I get a more homogeneous casting, with the talc and wax evenly mixed.






I took the plaster bat out of the water when it was competely saturated with water, and I dabbed the excess water out of it with a soft cloth, then set it on the floor for the pour. Because I am going to be using this casting while it is warm, I must watch it constantly after I pour it. This is what it looks like right after being poured. The surface is shiny.






When the surface gets solid, I use a tool to make some scores in the wax. These scores will help me to tear the wax into pieces I can use.






I tore the excess wax off the casting, leaving the two squares of wax. Then I pressed each square into a hip socket, using the plastic covered hip balls. Once I pushed the warm wax into the holes as far as I could, I tore off the excess wax around the ball, leaving the wax in the sockets. They will require some more work, but this is a good start for these sockets.






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