Saturday, November 30, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 385




Sanding the carving wax with a coarse sanding block can be used in the same way that the rake was used when modeling oil-clay. It shows where the low spots are. It also smooths the surface. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, November 29, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 384




I picked up the skull cap, worked on it with my paring knife and some sanding blocks, then taped it on the head with masking tape to check the fit. Click on the image to enlarge it.



The actual work is practice, practice, and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~Martha Armstrong-Hand (1920-2004)




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Thursday, November 28, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 383




A back view of my work-in-progress carving wax doll. Click on the image to enlarge it.



Happy Happy Joy Joy !!!






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Wednesday, November 27, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 382




I sanded the back of the left upper carving wax leg, first with coarse, then with a finer grade of sanding block. I used my paring knife to shave some more carving wax off the back of the leg before I did the sanding. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 381




I worked some more on the back of the right upper carving wax leg, adding carving wax filler to the joint between the ball and the leg. I did it the same way as I did the left leg a few days ago. Click on the image to make it larger.






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Monday, November 25, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 380




I sanded the back of the right upper carving wax leg, starting with a coarse grit, then sanding with a finer grit. One thing I really like about sanding carving wax is the lack of dust. The sandpaper eventually gets clogged with carving wax, but there is no sanding dust. I detest sanding dust. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, November 24, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 379




I worked on the back of the right upper carving wax leg with my paring knife. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Saturday, November 23, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 378




I worked on the back of the left upper carving wax leg with my paring knife. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, November 22, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 377




I repaired the left lower carving wax knee which had chipped. I used my wax pen and my paring knife. Click on the montage to enlarge it.






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Thursday, November 21, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 376




I discovered a new flash setting on my camera today, called Slow Sync, and look what it does ! The image on the left is my usual snapshot, all dark and dreary. The image on the right was taken with the Slow Sync setting turned on. I just never noticed it before. Anyway, I set up my carving wax doll to see what the back of the leg looks like, strung with elastic. Click on any image to enlarge it.






The image on the left was taken with the Fluorescent Light setting of the White Balance turned on. The image on the right is set to Auto. I think I like the Auto White Balance setting better. This is a side view of the leg.






The above images were taken with the camera on a tripod. These images were taken with the camera hand-held. I think the Slow Sync works good, with a hand-held camera. The image on the left is another view of the leg I'm working on. The image on the right shows a chip out of the knee that will need to be fixed. Usually, snapshots taken of the doll when she is on the project tray are really dark. Now they are showing up much better. I am so pleased with these improved images. While I am the first one to admit that I am one of the worst photographers, I am hoping that by the time I am ready to take some finished pix of my doll, I will be at least a little better than I am now. I must keep practicing.






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Wednesday, November 20, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 375




The back of the upper left carving wax leg looks like this where the ball joins the leg. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I filled in the area where the ball joins the leg with carving wax, but I did it in such a way that I can easily remove the filling if I don't like it. I did this by melting small amounts of carving wax with my wax pen, then scooping the molten wax up with a knife blade and applying it to the leg. Hot wax and cold wax do not join very well. Because I am not melting the base wax, and because the base wax is cold, the attached hot wax is not in the joint very securely. If I like it, I will use the wax pen to penetrate both the filler and the base, making them as one. If I do not like it, It should be easy to remove because it is just sitting on top of the join.






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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 374




I worked on the carving wax ankles of both lower legs, using my wax pen and paring knife. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, November 18, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 373




Awhile back I modeled some practice pieces in Roma oil-clay. This is a comparison of that Roma oil-clay practice foot, and the carving wax foot I worked on yesterday. I remember being quite happy with that practice foot, back when I did it. I was so happy that I kept it, and still have it. But when I look at it now, I laugh. That is how it is with making sculpture. The more I do, the better I get. It is practice, practice, and more practice in order to improve.






This is a snapshot of the oil-clay feet from 14 August 2012. I kept them in a rough, blocked shape so they would be easier to mold. This is how I saw Martha Armstrong-Hand doing it, from photos in her book. The hands she modeled in oil-clay, looked like mittens when she took her figure off the armature support. The feet looked like they had shoes on them. I followed her example, and tried to leave enough material in order to be able to carve later on.






This is a snapshot of the carving wax hands and feet from 14 November 2012. I have removed the casting sprues, also known as spares. I took the hands a little bit further than Martha did in her book. They still need a lot of work. But look at those feet. Even though I have only roughed out the carving wax feet that I have now, they are still way better than those fresh carving wax castings. I still have a lot of work to do on them, and I am spending some time studying the feet references I have.



I am at the point where I feel I need to start thinking about finishing this doll. I will have to make some compromises between staying faithful to the original oil-clay figure and my working drawing, and simplifying forms so they will be easier to use as patterns to make the plaster molds for slip casting. There is always a little trade-off.




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Sunday, November 17, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 372




I picked up the right carving wax foot and worked on it. This is a before snapshot. Click on any image to enlarge it.






This is an after snapshot.






This is a snapshot of the foot restrung, and in comparison with the left carving wax foot. There is much more work to do.






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Saturday, November 16, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 371




I did some work on the legs, then strung her up and revolved the legs back to back. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, November 15, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 370




One thing I've been wanting to check is how she is sitting now. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, November 14, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 369




I worked on the left upper carving wax leg in the same way I worked on the right upper carving wax leg yesterday. At the top is what it looks like before carving on it. In the middle is what it looks like after I carved on it. The bottom picture is a comparison of the right and left upper carving wax legs. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 368




After studying the turnaround photos from yesterday, I decided to take some of the curve off the back of the upper legs. The back of the upper leg has quite a curve in it. Click on the image to enlarge it.






Here it is after cutting off some of that curve. Next is to do the left upper leg in the same way. As usual, I am sneaking up on it, little by little.






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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 367




This is a turn around of the work-in-progress carving wax doll. I am trying to figure out how to do some camera lighting, using one incandescent bulb, and one florescent bulb placed on either side of the doll and slightly to the front. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, November 11, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 366




Today I smoothed the sharp edge on the bevel in front of the ball joint on the left carving wax upper leg in order to try and get it caught up with the right carving wax upper leg. One doll part is always getting ahead of another doll part. So the other doll part is always having to catch up. I try my best not to get too far ahead of one or the other doll parts. Sometimes that is easier said than done. Then again, what isn't? Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, November 10, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 365




Today I smoothed the sharp edge on the bevel in front of the ball joint on the right carving wax upper leg. This is what I was going to do yesterday, but ended up doing a repair job instead. Click on the image to enlarge it.



Today is 08 Joint Design Nº 365, which means it has been a year since I started working on joints in carving wax. One year ago, I was at 08 Joint Design Nº 1. Looking back, I can easily see how far I have come. This is one good thing about keeping a daily journal of my doll making progress. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day. Even on days that I am not inspired, or do not have any idea about what to do next, there is always something I can do to my doll that furthers her development. With that in mind, I continue this journey of making my BJD.




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