Tuesday, December 31, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 416




Here are comparison snapshots of the left and right carving wax hands. They are works-in-progress. It is easy to see how much work I have done on the left hand, when comparing it to the right hand, which is still rough. So much more work to do. I am hoping that this next year will be more productive than this year has been, although I have made some progress, it has been very slow. I am starting to feel more inspired, so I hope that will help me to make more progress, at a quicker rate. If not, then I must admit that this method of doing a little bit of work on my doll every day has paid off in the long run. Work was done on the doll whether I was inspired or not. When I was not inspired, there was always some sort of work that needed to be done, that did not require inspiration to do. Yeah... so that is how my doll has progressed from an idea and some drawings, to a carving wax doll that is test-strung, and is having the doll parts refined. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, December 30, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 415




I continue working on the left hand with my paring knife. Today I also filled my jeweler's alcohol lamp with denatured alcohol and used it to warm the blade of the paring knife when adding small amounts of carving wax to the hand. The left hand is 3.25 inches long (82mm), from the end of the ball to the tip of the index finger, and is one of the smallest parts of my doll. Right now, I am working to get the fingers to look like they might have joints (knuckles), and not look like rubber hoses that do not have any bones in them at all. I have given up on looking at photo references, and I am concentrating on getting them to just look right. As a result, I find myself fiddling with details on one part, and defining larger planes on other parts. As small as they are, the hands have a lot going on, even though I tried to keep the pose of this hand relatively simple. Click on any image to enlarge it.






Here are a couple of bonus snapshots of the WIP carving wax left hand. One shows a side view of the thumb, and the other shows the finger tips, . One technique that I am using, that I may not have mentioned before is burnishing. When I scrape off carving wax with my paring knife, there are carving wax shavings on the knife blade. Sometimes, I press these shavings into a spot, then use the knife blade to burnish them down. What burnishing does is compresses the carving wax. I can tell when it is burnished because the carving wax changes color, from very light, to almost as dark as the base carving wax. While this is not a good way to add larger pieces of carving wax, it does work well for small spots.






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Sunday, December 29, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 414




I continued working on the left carving wax hand with the paring knife and some of the new stainless steel carving tools. As I work, I try to keep in mind how I am going to be molding the hand in plaster, and that influences my design decisions as I am working. I am glad that I have some molding experience. If I did not have that experience, there are many places on the hand that I could be making mistakes that would make it much more difficult to mold the hand later on. I think this is why Martha Armstrong-Hand's method is more suited for the intermediate to advanced doll-maker, rather than for a first-time doll-maker. Her process requires knowledge of many traditional sculpture materials and methods. Beginners should probably stick with the easy-to-use materials and methods, such as LaDoll or Sculpey, and make OOAK dolls which do not require molding of any kind. This, of course, is only my opinion. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Saturday, December 28, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 413




The hands need a lot of work. Unfortunately, I did not take a before snapshot of this carving wax left hand, but instead, just picked it up and started working on it with my paring knife. Then I turned on my wax pen. I moved the index finger over by warming the base of it with my wax pen, then pressing on it to get it where I wanted it to be. I also added a piece of carving wax to the tip of the index finger and welded it in place because it was too short. Then I filled in various places with my wax pen and a scrap piece of carving wax, alternately scraping excess wax away with my paring knife. There is so much work to do on these hands because I did not do too much to them when they were oil-clay hands. I am happy that I made most of the hand larger than what it will end up. For me, it is easier to carve carving wax than it is to model it. Oil-clay is much better for additive modeling than carving wax is. Each material has its strengths. Needless to say, I still have much work to do on the carving wax hands. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Friday, December 27, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 412




I finally finished using the 1.5 X 3 inch pieces of 60-grit sandpaper. I am doing the same thing with the right lower carving arm as I did with the left one. Click on any image to enlarge it.






After lightly sanding the lower arm, it was easy to see where I needed to do some work. I used my wax pen and a piece of scrap carving wax to fill in areas that needed filling. Then I used my paring knife to subtract excess carving wax from the filled areas.






Then I sanded the arm again with 60-grit sandpaper. This process will continue until the doll parts have been refined for use as patterns for the final production molds. The final production molds could be made from silicone rubber if I wanted to cast resin, or plaster of Paris for slip casting. I will be making slip casting molds from these doll parts.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (1920-2004)




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Thursday, December 26, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 411




I picked up the left lower carving wax arm and began sanding it with 60-grit sandpaper. This is what it looked like after lightly sanding it. I can easily see where it needs some work. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I use my wax pen and a scrap of carving wax to fill some places that need filling.






After adding, I use my paring knife to subtract excess filler. Even after getting some fancy carving tools, this paring knife, picked up for 50 cents at a flea market, is still one of my most favorite tools.






When I subtract carving wax, I try to match the surrounding surface as best as I can. I may not get it exactly right this time around, and may have to do some more adding and subtracting later on, to get it right.






After subtracting carving wax, I sand again. Once again, this shows me where work needs to be done.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (1920-2004)




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Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 409




I continue to work on the carving wax feet. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, December 23, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 408




I did some carving on the doll's left foot. I used my new set of carving tools. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, December 22, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 407




So, I picked up the other foot and sanded it with 60-grit sandpaper, then put them together for a Twin snapshot. See what I mean when I say that sanding really brings out what needs to be done? By the way, why are the slots on these feet so narrow? This carving wax doll, after all, is being test-strung with 3mm round elastic doll cord. Those slots are 2mm wide. Well, the wire that the s-hook is made of, is 1.5mm wide, and the slot is just a hair wider than the s-hook, so it can slide in the slot. Feet, in a BJD, are terminating joints.






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Saturday, December 21, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 406




I picked up the left craving wax foot and started sanding on it with 60-grit sandpaper. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Friday, December 20, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 405




This area of the lower torso needs to be filled in order to match the left side. As usual, I am sneaking up on it, a little bit at a time. This is a before and after snapshot of what I did today. I used my wax pen, paring knife, and 60-grit sandpaper. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, December 19, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 404




I picked up the left upper carving wax arm and started sanding it with 60-grit sandpaper. The 60-grit sandpaper really shows me where the arm needs some work. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 403




I worked on the upper right carving wax arm today, adding, subtracting, and sanding. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 402




I did some more sanding on the upper torso, then started sanding the upper right carving wax arm with 60-grit sandpaper. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, December 16, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 401




I did some sanding with 60-grit sandpaper on the front of the carving wax upper torso. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, December 15, 2013

08 Joint Design Nº 400




There is a very low spot beside the left breast that may be an undercut in the mold, if left unfilled. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I place some scrap carving wax in the low spot.






I use my wax pen to weld the scrap carving wax to the carving wax torso, making sure that I fuse the body and the scrap completely together.






I scrape the excess carving wax filler away, using my paring knife.






I sand the area with 60-grit sandpaper. I will be using finer and finer grits of sandpaper as I refine the carving wax doll parts.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (1920-2004)




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