Friday, January 31, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 447




I worked on the left carving wax foot with 100-grit sandpaper. This is a snapshot of the feet together. I will probably start working on the right foot next? Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, January 30, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 446




I worked on the left carving wax foot today. I did a little bit of everything, including filling in the slot in the ankle ball. I am going to make a new cut for it. Click on any image to enlarge it.



For my own information. I weighed the carving wax doll parts today on the digital kitchen scale. It reported the temperature as 63°F. Total ounces of all parts: 129.875oz = 8.12 pounds. Total grams of all parts: 3679g = 3.679kg. This weight has nothing to do with the final weight of the composition slip doll because the thickness of the carving wax doll parts varies so much.




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Wednesday, January 29, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 445




I did some more work on the left upper carving wax leg. I added with my wax pen, subtracted with my paring knife, and smoothed with 100-grit sandpaper. Click on any image to enlarge it.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




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Tuesday, January 28, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 444






I worked on the left upper leg today. I started out by filling little air holes with my wax pen. As I worked on those, I also filled in some other areas. Then I used my paring knife to shave off the excess filler. Finally, I sanded the leg with 60-grit sandpaper. It looks like there are more low spots to fill. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I have found some more biographical information about Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004). One is a newspaper clipping from the Kingman Daily Miner, that appeared on 17 July 1998. The other is from a preview of a book by Krystyna Poray Goddu, called Dollmakers and Their Stories: Women Who Changed the World of Play. (2004)



I found this excerpt from Dollmakers and Their Stories (2004) by Krystyna Poray Goddu at Google books:



More biographical information information about her can be found at http://www.niada.org/InOurMemory/inourmemoryHand.html as well as photographs of her at http://www.destombe.nl/foto/family/martha-05/

I do not think I need to remind anyone that it is Martha Armstrong-Hand's method that I am following to make my doll.




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Monday, January 27, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 443




This is the left lower carving wax leg. Previously, I sanded it with 60-grit sandpaper. The 60-grit sandpaper helps me to see where the low spots are. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I use my wax pen to add carving wax to the low spots. This takes time to do properly. Properly done, the carving wax is not just dripped onto the surface. I always melt into the base carving wax with the tip of my wax pen, then add filler to it. Sometimes it takes awhile for the molten wax to solidify. I must wait for it to solidify before I can turn the leg. I am able to fill other low spots while I am waiting for a molten spot to solidify, if the other low spots are in the same plane as the spot that is solidifying.






After filling, I scrape the excess filler off with my paring knife. This is something that also takes time to do properly. If I am trying to fill a low spot, I do not want to carve too much of the excess away, and make a new low spot. Sometimes I get in a hurry. I must remind myself to slow down and do it right the first time.






After scraping the excess filler off, I sand the left lower carving wax leg with 100-grit sandpaper. The 100-grit sandpaper is supposed to take out the sanding marks from the 60-grit sandpaper. I still have 150-grit, and 220-grit sanding to do. I will see how it goes. As much as I dislike sanding, 220-grit may be as smooth as I want to sand this carving wax doll. Of course, when I finish sanding all the parts, they will be used as patterns to make the final plaster molds for slip casting.






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Sunday, January 26, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 442




Even though it won't be seen, I worked on the neck socket of the carving wax head. I also did some fiddly work around the ears (not shown). Click on the image to enlarge it.






This is what the neck socket looked like before I worked on it.



Photo from 22 January 2014 blog post.




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Saturday, January 25, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 441




I used my paring knife to subtract carving wax from some areas I had previously filled with my wax pen. I have not sanded these areas yet. These are some snapshots of what I did. Click on an image to enlarge it.






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Friday, January 24, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 440




I started working around the eyes. I use my wax pen to add, and my paring knife and my stainless steel carving tools to subtract. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Thursday, January 23, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 439




I worked some more on the skull cap. I added carving wax using my wax pen. I subtracted excess carving wax with my paring knife (not shown). I sanded with 100-grit sandpaper. Now, I can no longer see light through the joint. The outside edges still need some work. Yeah, I am sneaking up on it, as usual. I try to do a little bit of work on my doll every day. Click on any image to enlarge it.



I use a full sheet of 100-grit sandpaper laid flat on my work table. Then I put the head or skull cap down on the sandpaper and move it back and forth across the surface of the sandpaper in order to get the joint flat.





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