Wednesday, April 30, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 32




This is the last piece of this first foot mold. I apply a soap-water parting agent with a brush.






I clamp the coddles in place and secure them to the table with some coils of oil-clay.






2 parts of water to 3 parts of plaster.






Always add plaster to water. Let the plaster slack. Then push the island of plaster down and mix until there are no more lumps and the mix is creamy smooth. Cold water lengthens the setup time. More agitation shortens the setup time. Allow the mix to stand until an S can be drawn on it, and it stays.






Turn ON the vibrator.
Pour the plaster evenly into the coddles.
Turn OFF the vibrator.






Pour any excess plaster into the lined trash can.
Rinse off your hands, mixing bowls, and tools in the bucket of water.
Never pour plaster (dry, set, or wet) down the drain pipes.



Allow the plaster to setup completely for at least an hour.




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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 31




This is what the new piece of the foot mold looks like this morning. After I poured it, I left it to setup, and this is the first time I've looked at it since I made it yesterday. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I removed the clamps and the coddles.






There is a little bit of cleaning to do. I used the fettling knife to get most of the oil-clay and leaked plaster off.






This part of the mold is ready to be soaped.






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Monday, April 28, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 30




It has been awhile since I worked on this multiple-piece plaster foot mold. It is recommended to wet the surface of the plaster before soaping it, if some time has passed. I use a spray bottle of water to wet the plaster before soaping it. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I apply the soap parting agent.






I clamp the coddles around the mold and secure the coddles in place with some coils of oil-clay.






I tare the mixing bowl to zero on the baby scale. I weigh one pound of water and one and one half pounds of plaster.






I mix the plaster and water together. Always add plaster to water! Let the plaster slack until the water is completely absorbed. Push the island of plaster below the surface and mix until it is creamy smooth, with no lumps. When I can draw an S on the surface with my finger, and it stays, the mix is ready to pour.






I turn ON the vibrator.
I pour the plaster into the coddles evenly.
I turn OFF the vibrator.






I pour the excess plaster into the lined trash can.
I wash my hands, mixing bowl, and tools in the bucket of water.
NEVER put plaster (dry, wet, or set) down the drain pipes.



It takes at least an hour for the plaster to set up completely. The plaster will undergo an exothermic reaction (it heats up). Then it cools down. I usually just walk away from the mold and ignore it for several hours, or even until the next day, before opening the coddles.




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Sunday, April 27, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 497




I am hoping that I will have a large enough block of time in the coming week to get back to making the foot mold. In the meantime, I am continuing to refine various carving wax doll parts. There is always something to do. I started out by placing a piece of scrap carving wax in the neck hole of the upper carving wax torso. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used my wax pen to add carving wax and weld the scrap piece of carving wax into the hole.






I used the paring knife to subtract the excess carving wax from the neck hole, trying my best to match the surrounding surface.






I smoothed the filled-in area with 150-grit sandpaper.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




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Saturday, April 26, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 496




I continued to refine the upper carving wax leg. Click on any image to enlarge it.






Adding with the wax pen and a piece of scrap carving wax.






Subtracting with the paring knife.






Smoothing with 150-grit sandpaper.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly.~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




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Friday, April 25, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 495




These are the upper carving wax legs together for a comparison. I need to do some work on the upper right carving wax leg which is on the left in the snapshot below. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I use my wax pen and a scrap piece of carving wax to add carving wax along the seams, where needed.






I use my paring knife to subtract excess carving wax from the filled-in areas.






I use a piece of 100-grit sandpaper to smooth the area that I worked on. It still needs some work, but it is better than when I started working.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




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Thursday, April 24, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 494




Today I filled-in the slots on the carving wax hands. I started by cutting pieces of scrap carving wax to fit the slots. I used the wax pen to weld the scrap carving wax into the slots. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used a steak knife with a sharp, thin blade to trim excess carving wax from the filled-in slots. I used the paring knife to remove carving wax to match the existing surface of the ball joint.






I smoothed the filled-in area with 150-grit sandpaper.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 Ocotber 2004)




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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 493




I worked on the lower carving wax arms today, adding, subtracting, and smoothing. Click on the image to enlarge it.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




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Tuesday, April 22, 2014

08 Joint Design Nº 492




I worked on filling the slots of the ball joints in the upper arms today. I used scraps of carving wax as filler. I used the wax pen to weld the pieces of scrap in the slots, making sure I melted the filler and the base wax together. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used a steak knife with a sharp, thin blade to trim off most of the excess carving wax. Then I switched over to my paring knife to scrape the remaining excess carving wax down to match the surface of the ball.






I used 150-grit sandpaper to smooth the surface.



The actual work is practice, practice and more practice: adding, subtracting, and smoothing repeatedly. ~ Martha Armstrong-Hand (4 July 1920 - 22 October 2004)




Links To BJD Tutorials




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