Thursday, July 31, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 94




Today I test-fitted coddles for the third piece of the plaster mold for the lower carving wax leg. It looks like these may work okay, raised up about 1.5 inches. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 93




This is a work-in-progress snapshot of the registration keys being cut. I also trimmed the sides with the paring knife. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 92




I removed the coddles and the oil-clay. Click on any image to enlarge it.






There was one small leak.






Easily fixed.






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Monday, July 28, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 91




Today I poured the second half of the plaster mold for the left lower carving wax leg. I had already cut the registration keys and secured the coddles. I applied the parting agent. I used a 50/50 solution of liquid soap and water for the parting agent. I applied it with an old paint brush. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I weighed the water and plaster. Always add plaster to water..






I mixed the plaster and water, then poured the mix into the coddles with the mold table vibrator running.






I cleaned my hands and the plaster mixing bucket in a 5-gallon bucket of water. Never put plaster (dry, set, or wet) down the drain pipes. I leave the poured plaster alone for at least an hour for it to set up properly.






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Sunday, July 27, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 90




I decided to try and raise the coddles up instead of making a new set of coddles. I will have to make a new set of coddles eventually, for the torso. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I pressed coils of oil-clay all around the bottom of the coddles.






I also pressed oil-clay coils around the wood that raised the coddles.






I hope that this will work. Next I need to apply the parting agent to the plaster.






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Saturday, July 26, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 89




The kneecap on the carving wax leg is about 4.5 inches high. The coddles I used for the first half of this mold are about 5.0 inches high. I will need to raise the coddles up an inch or so (to 6.0 inches), or use different coddles for the second half of the mold. I'm glad I measured this before I got too far ahead of myself. Click on the image to enlarge it.



In other news, we spent all morning and much of the afternoon harvesting vegetables and processing them. We got tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, corn, Swiss chard, parsley, sweet basil, eggplant, plus a few peppers. This is a snapshot of the veggies laid out on the counter in the kitchen, right after picking them.






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Friday, July 25, 2014

Thursday, July 24, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 87




I continue cleaning the first mold half. Next, I need to make some registration keys. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 86




I worked on that small area of the first half of the mold that didn't quite reach the parting line. I filled it in with some oil-clay. What that means is that I will have to clean that bit off each and every casting that comes out of this mold. It is so small that I would rather do that than make the entire mold half over again. I will have to remember this thought later, when I am making castings. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I also rolled out a slab of oil-clay to cover the socket of the lower leg. I think it is easier to seal the socket with oil-clay than to try and seal it with the coddles. There is always more than one way to do something. Another way of doing this would be to fill in the socket with oil-clay. I am going to do it this way.






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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 85




I found a small area of the parting line that might get locked in the second half of the mold. This is a new problem to solve. The easy fix is to just put a small bit of oil-clay there. It would mean a little more clean-up for the final casting. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, July 21, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 84




Today I worked on cleaning up the mold table, the first mold half, and the oil-clay. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, July 20, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 83




I removed the coddles. It doesn't look like plaster got into any place that it wasn't wanted. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I flipped the mold over. So far, so good.






I removed the clay build-up. A wee bit of plaster got under the vertical build-up, but not enough to harm anything.






Another angle of view.






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Saturday, July 19, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 82




I finally found the largest mixing bowl in my plastic mixing bowl set, but alas, it is also too small. Click on the image to enlarge it.






I had to go outside and get a pail from the garden and clean it up. I tared the empty bucket, then put 4 pounds and 14 ounces of clean cool tap water in it. Cool water will help retard the setup time of plaster. Warm water will cause it to set up faster.






I also weighed out 7 pounds 4 ounces of plaster of Paris.






I followed my usual method of slacking, mixing, and pouring the plaster, using the mold table vibrator.






I poured the excess plaster in the lined trash can. I washed off my hands and the mixing bucket in the bucket of water. Never put plaster (dry, set, or wet) down the drain !!!.






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Friday, July 18, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 81




Oops !. This mixing bowl is much too small. Click on the image to enlarge it.



Some Arithmetic

I measured the inside dimensions of the mold, and it is 4.75 inches wide by 8.75 inches long by 3.375 inches high, more or less. That comes out to about 140.27343 cubic inches of volume. This is a very rough estimate. There are 14.4375 cuin in 1 US cup. So 140.27343 cuin divided by 14.4375 is 9.71590 cups.

Now, there are 8 ounces in one cup, so 8 oz X 9.71590 cups is 77.72720 total ounces of water. And 77.72720 oz divided by 16 oz of water in one pound comes out to 4.85795 pounds of water.

How many ounces is .85795? 16 oz times .85795 is 13.72720 oz, which can be rounded off to 14 ounces. So the water will weigh about 4 pounds 14 oz.

I want a mold consistency of 67 (which is 2 parts of water to 3 parts of plaster, by weight). So 4 pounds 14 ounces divided by 2 will give me ONE part, or 2 pounds 7 ounces.

To get the total weight of plaster, I multiply 2 pounds 7 ounces X 3 to get 7 pounds 5 ounces of plaster.

So when I find a larger mixing bowl, I will weigh out:

4 pounds 14 ounces of water (just under 5 pounds), and
7 pounds 5 ounces of plaster

That should give me a little bit more plaster than what I need. Better to mix a little bit more than not enough.




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Thursday, July 17, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 80




I secured the coddles to the molding table with some coils of oil-clay. Click on any image to enlarge it.






Over the years I have become somewhat sloppy in my mold-making methods. I no longer spend a lot of time filling in little spaces around the edges between the oil-clay and the coddles. I just know that the plaster will not go very far, and it will be easier for me to knock off that thin piece of plaster after it has setup.






Most of the corners are a pretty good fit.






I doubt that too much plaster will get behind here.






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