Tuesday, September 30, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 155




This snapshot shows more work-in-progress on the oil-clay build-up for the upper leg. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Monday, September 29, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 154




I continue working on the oil-clay build-up around the upper leg. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Sunday, September 28, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 153




This is a work-in-progress snapshot of the oil-clay build-up getting lined-up with the parting line on the carving wax pattern. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Saturday, September 27, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 152




I used the cardboard template to cut out the oil-clay clay build-up. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Friday, September 26, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 151




I made a cardboard template for the build-up today. First of all, I centered the carving wax leg on the cut-out cereal-box cardboard, making sure that I had at least 1.50 inches all around the leg. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used the little plastic card as a square, and a mechanical pencil to draw a dotted line around the outside of the leg.






I drew a solid cut line about 1/8th of an inch outside the dotted line. I drew a center line through the length of the leg. I measured the 1.50 inch lines all around the outside of the leg.






The template fits over the carving leg pattern with a 1/8th inch space all around. I will use this template to cut out the oil-clay build-up.






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Thursday, September 25, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 150




I used carbon paper, taped to a square (in this case, a plastic card) to draw the parting line around the leg. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 149




The next mold will be for one of the upper carving wax legs. This upper leg has measurements of 6.75 inches by 3 inches by 3 inches. Adding 1.5 inches all around will add up to a mold that is about 9.75 inches by 6 inches by 6 inches. This will be the largest mold, so far. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 148




I cleaned off my mold table, spread some newsprint on top of it, and painted a coat of orange shellac on some of the coddles I have in my studio. Here are before and after snapshots of the coddles... Click on any image to enlarge it.



... and some more.






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Monday, September 22, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 147




I like to carve the spare after making the mold. I start by drawing the layout of the spare with a pencil, and a combination square/ruler.






First I carve the ends of the spare, which are two half circles at the ends of a cone shape, with one large half circle and one small half circle. I use my paring knife for all the carving. Plaster is very homogeneous and relatively easy to carve. I shave off a little bit at a time, so it is easy to do.






Next, I carve out the middle, between the two half circles that I have already carved. I carve from the middle, out to the pencil lines.






Finally, I bevel the top edge of the mold.






I repeat the above steps for the other half of the spare. Here is a snapshot of the finished spare.






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Sunday, September 21, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 146




I beveled the edges of the mold. Beveling the edges helps prolong the life of the mold. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used the SurForm and the paring knife to bevel the edges.






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Saturday, September 20, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 145




I opened the mold today. The pieces came right apart. The carving wax pattern came right out. I still need to bevel the edges. Click on the image to enlarge it.






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Friday, September 19, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 144




A review of the book, Yoshida Style II is included in this post.

I apply a 50/50 soap/water parting agent to the plaster that I am going to pour new plaster on top of. Plaster sticks to plaster, so I always try to remember to apply a parting agent first. I cut the registration keys before applying the parting agent. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I make sure that the coddles are clamped around the mold as tightly as I can get them. I also secure the coddles to the molding table with some coils of oil-clay. I use a mold table vibrator, and if don't secure the coddles to the table, the vibrator will cause it to move around when I am trying to pour the plaster. Yeah, been there, done that.






I weighed the water and plaster according to the arithmetic I did. Then I mixed them together thoroughly. I poured the plaster mix when it was ready. I used the mold table vibrator when I poured the plaster. I put the excess plaster in the lined trash bin. I rinsed my hands and the mixing container in the 5-gallon bucket of water. Never put plaster (dry, set, or wet) down the drain pipes.






YOSHIDA STYLE II Book Review

YOSHIDA STYLE II: BALL JOINTED MAKING ADVANCED GUIDE.
RYO YOSHIDA.
Tokyo, Japan: Hobby Japan, 2014.
ISBN: 978-4-7986-0782-5

CONTENTS
Forward                                           6
Flow Chart                                        8
Contents                                          9
Chapter I Primary original mold                  11
        I-1 Model a primary original mold        12
        I-2 Make preparations for making a mold  18
        I-3 Make a mold                          22
        I-4 Liquid plaster                       28

Chapter II Shaping with a mold                   33
        II-1 Shaping with a mold                 34
        II-2 Shaping the secondary original mold 40

Chapter III Ball Joints                          49
        III-1 Fix ball joints                    50
        III-2 Arms & Legs' ball joints       54
        III-3 Knees double ball joints           58
        III-4 Set up fingers' ball joints        62
        III-5 Ball joints of abdominal           68

Chapter IV Variation                             77
        IV-1 Proportions change                  78

Chapter V Finish                                 85
        V-1 Painting                             86
        V-2 Styling                              92

Chapter VI Molded item                          111
        VI-1 Parting line                       112
        VI-2 Plaster mold making                116
        VI-3 Modeling Cast                      124

Tools & Material                    10, 32, 110
Afterward                                       136

This is a book written in the Japanese language, and I cannot read Japanese. However, like the first book, this book has intensive photo series of each step. After going over the photos carefully, I made some notes about what I understand the photos are about. These are my notes about this book:

Chapter I-1 is about modeling the original figure in a material that looks like oil-clay, and may be called PLAXTIN, which appears to be made in Italy. This original clay model is called a 'mold' but it is not the mold, but a model of a female figure, formed in clay. The ball joints are styrofoam balls of various sizes. The sockets are formed around the styrofoam balls.
Chapter I-2 is about making the parting lines on the clay figure in preparation for molding. This is followed by details about making the build-ups around the parts, along the parting lines.
Chapter I-3 is about making coddles with clay walls around the build-ups and pouring/applying plaster. These molds look a lot like the plaster rough shell molds that Martha Armstrong-Hand makes in her book.
Chapter I-4 looks like some information about mixing plaster, along with some arithmetic.

Chapter II-1 looks like it is about methods of drying the plaster molds in a box with a hair blower. Then air-dry clay is rolled and pressed into each half of the plaster molds. Excess clay is trimmed. The mold halves are then pressed together to make hollow doll parts. The individual doll parts are then taken out of the plaster molds.
Chapter II-2 is about shaping the air-dry clay parts of the figure. Once again, this is referred to as a 'mold', but it is a molded model of the original doll that was modeled in PLAXTIN. Much of this chapter seems to be about repairing the air-dry clay doll parts that were press molded in the plaster molds. At the end of this chapter, all the air-dry clay figure parts have had the flashing removed, holes filled, and other repairs made as well. Even doll eyes have been placed in the head. The emphasis seems to be on reproducing the original PLAXTIN clay doll in air-dry clay, as several heads are shown, as well as several of the other doll parts.

Chapter III-1 is about shaping the air-dry ball joints with some custom made tools.
Chapter III-2 covers making the ball joints for the arms and legs.
Chapter III-3 details making the peanut style double joints for the knees.
Chapter III-4 has details about making finger joints. Only the first knuckle joint of each finger, where the finger meets the hand, is jointed.
Chapter III-5 covers different styles of torso joints.

Chapter IV-1 goes into modifying the proportions of the molded air-dry clay parts to make variations to the dolls created from the plaster molds.
Chapter V-1 is about painting the face and blushing the body parts.
Chapter V-2 is about wigs.

Chapter VI-1 is about making a mold of a finished air-dry clay doll. The parting lines are drawn first.
Chapter VI-2 details making an oil-clay build-up around each doll part, and pouring plaster for molds that will be used for slip casting.
Chapter VI-3 is about pouring the finished plaster molds using an air-dry slip called Modeling Cast. Information is also shown for repairing and mending the cast doll parts.

This is a Japanese language book, just like the first book about making a BJD, by Ryo Yoshida.

How does this book compare to the first book?
The first book is about making a One Of A Kind BJD using air-dry clay (LaDoll).
The second book is also about making BJDs with air-dry clay, but there is a slight twist.
The original figure is modeled in modeling clay.
Then plaster shell molds are made of that figure.
Air-dry clay is pressed into those molds to make hollow air-dry clay doll parts.
Multiple air-dry clay reproductions of the original clay figure may be made in the plaster press molds.
Then the air-dry clay copies are finished, just like the OOAK BJD in the first book.
The first book has much more detail about face-ups, wigs, shoes, and so forth.
The second book then shows how to make plaster slip-casting molds using a finished air-dry clay BJD as a model, and casting reproduction doll parts in air-dry slip. This slip is poured into the plaster molds just like Porcelain slip, but an electric kiln is not needed to cure the cast BJD. They harden in the air.

I am very glad that I purchased this second book of YOSHIDA STYLE.
The two volumes compliment each other.
Now, if only a scholar of the Japanese language, with an interest in making BJDs, would be willing to translate this second volume into English, as the first volume was, the world would rejoice.




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Thursday, September 18, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 143




Even though Math is not one of my strong points, I still like to try and figure out how much plaster to mix. Sometimes it helps, and sometimes it doesn't. This third piece has the dimensions of 5.0 inches by 5.75 inches by 1.5 inches. Click on the image to enlarge it.



1 CUP =  about 14.44 cubic inches

5.0 in. X 5.75 in. X 1.5 in.
43.1250 cubic inches

43.1250 cu in divided by 14.44 cu in
2.98649 cups

I round that off to 3.0

3.0 C X 8 oz
24.0 ounces

24 ounces divided by 2 (to get ONE part)
12.0

2 parts water X 12
24 ounces of water = 1 pound 8 oz water

3 parts plaster X 12
36 ounces of plaster = 2 pounds 4 oz plaster

24/36 = 2/3
.66666 (67 consistency)


I hope that's right?




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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 142




Today I cut the registration keys for the third piece of this mold. I use a home made key cutter made from a flattened tea spoon with a long aluminum gutter nail duct-taped to it. I found the nail in the grass after we had our old gutters replaced with new gutters a few years ago. These long nails can also be purchased at hardware stores. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I also remembered to remove the oil-clay from the socket. Yay !!!.






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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 141




Today I trimmed the sides of the mold in order to fit the coddles for the third piece of the mold. I used some scraps of wood to raise the coddles up about 1.50 inches. Click on any image to enlarge it.






I used the SurForm and my paring knife to trim the mold. The coddles are now a little bit over 1.5 inches above the carving wax pattern.






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Monday, September 15, 2014

09 Plaster Production Molds Nº 140




I removed the coddles, cleaned them, then did the same thing to the oil-clay. One more piece of the mold to pour. Click on any image to enlarge it.






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